‘Ahead for health’ – Mental health awareness DVD

‘Ahead for health’ – Mental health awareness DVD


Healthy Working Lives ľ Ahead for health NHS Mental Health Awareness. Toolbox Talk. Two groups from different workplaces chat
with an employment specialist, Richard Scothorne, about mental health issues. There are also two animated workers. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE, employment specialist]
Mental might seem like an odd topic for a Toolbox Talk, but in fact thousands of man
hours are lost every year as a result of people not taking care of their mental health. Hi everyone. I’m not a doctor. I’m an expert in employee welfare, so I’m
looking for some common sense suggestions and I hope these guys are going to help. [CAPTION:
Ahead for health Looking after the smartest tool in the box.] [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
So Friday morning, a long week how’s it been? [PAUL MOONEY, joiner]
Friday’s always a good day, going into the weekend. [CRAIG GUTHRIE, painter and decorator]
Generally at the end of the week after putting in your shifts and your graft and if there’s
any overtime then I’d say you get a little bit tired by the end of that. So, a wee bit of R and R is well deserved,
and well looked forward to. [MICHAELA ROBINSON, apprentice plumber]
The week’s been long, the days are so long, Monday’s so long so I’m glad it’s Friday,
a short day. [COLIN MCMULLAN, joiner]
You always feel better Friday. Friday, it’s the end of the week, you’re looking
forward, you’ve got the weekend. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
And how are you feeling mentally? [COLIN MCMULLAN]
I’m mentally fine, physically struggling, ha! [laughter] [STEPHEN MACKAY, joiner]
Every day you think, what am I gonna’ be doing, what am I gonna’ be doing, what’s gonna’ happen? [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
And what’s that mentally like? [STEPHEN MACKAY]
Mentally, aye, exciting but also nervous. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
Nervous? [STEPHEN MACKAY]
Yep. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
And what do you do about that? [STEPHEN MACKAY]
Ehů try not to think about it so much. [SAM FERGUSON, engineer]
I take things, life too seriously, if you know what I mean. [Richard Scothorne: uh huh]. I would get stressed first before any of the
company here. [Richard Scothorne: hmm mm] I like just nothing
going wrong, if you know what I mean. [IAIN ROLLO, plater]
I don’t think I get stressed to be honest with you. Maybe my wife would tell you different, but
I think I’m quite easy ozy. I think I dement her half the time because
of that attitude. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
So how would you respond if one of your workmates had a mental health issue? [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Ah it doesn’t make me think any less of them. Just try ľ know ask them ľ if you feel they’re
approachable or, and see what you can do. If you can give them any advice, if you could. [JOHN LOGUE, caulker burner]
When it’s work related, if it’s maybe more in their personal life it’s maybe different. I just tend to find, you see somebody having
problems, you speak to them, try and understand their problems and try and maybe, know, help
them. [PAUL MOONEY]
You get guys whoů “I’m not working with him, he’s a nutter”. And you’re going, “How’s he a nutter?” “Oh, there’s something wrong with him, he’s
always things on his mind.” And you’re saying, “But that doesn’t make
him a nutter!” It’s more a slagging each other, we would
probably more slag them and bring them back in, “You’re not getting any sympathy in here,
you want somebody to, away home to your missus, don’t come in here looking for sympathy.” And just get on with it. And that’s probably the way we deal with it. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
And is that, is that a good idea? Does that work? [PAUL MOONEY]
Sometimes. Sometimes it might look as if it’s working
but you could be, the guy inside could be going to bits and you’ll not know unless they
open up to you. [ANIMATION ľ one character examines the other’s
head] [CHARACTER 1]
Awff brilliant, that’s all we need. Come on, stick your bunnet up. Hey ho ho hey, phew, you’re totally done in
here my man. When did you last have a break? [CAPTION:
Keep Active. Take a Break] [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
How about breaks. Do you manage to get away from it all? [IAIN ROLLO]
The only break you really get during the working day is at the dinner time. I mean, the type of work we do, it’s not as
if you can just stand about, and if the gaffer comes up and asks you, “What you doing?”,
say, “I’m having a break.” Well, that is a no no. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
What do you do in your breaks? [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Just generally have a cup of tea and have a chat with the boys. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
And does that feel like a real break? [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Yeah, it’s a break at the same time, yeah, but you get away, just, obviously you need
something to eat but you get away and you’re sitting in with the rest of the boys, some
of them are different squads, so then you can have a chat with them. Our work’s left in here, try and leave it
in here, butů [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
How do you doů that’s a very deliberate act? [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Oh I just try, leave that behind you, know you, you don’t want to be working 24/7. [PAUL MOONEY]
When you’re talking to your missus she’s going, “What are you talking about?” half of the time. So you talk to people in the same sort of
game as yourselves, so, you’re always in amongst that, even if it’s in the pub, you’re sitting,
“How’s it in at work today, what’s that site like and what’s another site like?” So, [Richard Scothorne: uh uh] it’s always
there. But it is a way of de-stressing you, Ĺcos
when you’re talking about it, you’re letting off a bit of steam about somebody that’s annoyed
the life out you that day. “Did you see that git what he was doing the
day?” So, you get it out your system then. [MICHAELA ROBINSON]
I can switch off, but it’s hard to. But I want to leave my work at my work, and
not anywhere, we don’t want to take it home and then cause arguments with my family, so,
I’d rather just leave it here. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
What do the rest of you do to switch off? Paul, you must do something to switch off
completely? [PAUL MOONEY]
Play games on the computer. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
Really? [PAUL MOONEY]
That’s my chill. [COLIN MCMULLAN]
I go fishing, I like to go away, well I just go out on the boat and, and we chill out there
altogether. There’s no noise whatsoever, just relax. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
Let’s talk a bit about exercise, you’re talking, was someone going to the gym? Who was going to the gym? [STEPEN MACKAY]
Some of us go to the gym! [Laughter] [COLIN MCMULLAN]
I play five-a-sidesů [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
You play five-a-sides? [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Five-a-sides and that, aye but justů [PAUL MOONEY]
The only exercise I get is walking. I like walking just myself, just wandering
about, that clears my head. [CRAIG GUTHRIE]
We’ve got our own little lock-up and we basically just have loose weights and we go and work
out, three times a week for a couple of hours. Em, and I can forget all about work, I can
just shut it off. [SAM FERGUSON]
I like doing the running, the marathons, the half marathon, and go down to London and Dublin
and things like that. I’m very active, I’m hyper, that’s the word
I’m looking at, hyper, all the time. I’ve got to be on the go all the time. [CAPTION:
Keep Active. Take a Break.] [ANIMATION ľ one character examines the other,
referring to a User Manual] [CHARACTER 2]
Oof ho ho, oof, sorry about that, I’ve been a bit stressed lately. [CHARACTER 1]
Ah no bother son, we’ve all been there. [CHARACTER 2]
Look thanks for helping. It’s good to have somebody to talk to. [CHARACTER 1]
Eh? It’s alright, you’d do the same for me wouldn’t
you? [CHARACTER 2]
Aye. Maybe I’ll go and see my maw, she always cheers
me up. [CHARACTER 1]
Ah ha! [CAPTION:
Care for Others Keep in Touch] [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
And when was the last time you helped someone out? Can you tellů any stories you can tell us? [COLIN MCMULLAN]
I think Monday ha! Well, Tuesday it was. Stephen was off on Monday, it’s not like him,
and he came in, and he had problems at home. It was a relationship thing, but we spoke
to him Tuesday, we knew, the head was down, you could tell Stevie, the head was down and
that but, he, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, that’s him back on the ball just. Quiet, quiet word andů [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
And that was talking, listening? [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Yeah. Just a quiet word in his ear, and speak to
him and then, slag him in front of everybody, that’s what we do after that but. [STEPEN MACKAY]
Back to normality it is. [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Back to normality, bring him back in. Justů [STEPEN MACKAY]
I think they found people’ll bottle up, well me especially, I’ll bottle it up, bottle it
up, bottle itů And it goes on for so long and then, just ľ bang ľ everything just
comes together, all the wee things come together and it just, like a volcano, you just, erupt
and then, and then that’s it. And you have to get back to normality just,
back to your friends, talking normally, and then, as soon as you can start having a laugh
and a joke. I wasn’t speaking to anybody, I was just quiet,
and it’s not like me. And then, everybody asked, “How are you?” And then, that’s it, back to the slagging
match, back to the, the banter in work, which gets you through it. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
And back to the real Stevie. [STEPEN MACKAY]
Yep. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
Uh huh. And how about eh, friends and family, how
often do you see them? [MICHAELA ROBINSON]
Every day. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
Every day? [MICHAELA ROBINSON]
Yeah. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
And does that, does that make you feel good? [MICHAEL ROBINSON]
It does uh huh. And I can talk to them if I need them. [CRAIG GUTHRIE]
We actually spend more time in here than what we do with our own families. So we talk to each other more than we do with
our own families as well. And, we share the same problems, issues, the
ups and the downs that everybody else has in life. [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Your kids a lot of the time, when people go home it’s more the kids and the wife, know
ha! The wife’s run of the mill you get her every
day, you usually get the grief off her when you go in but, the wee one you get the same
every time, she comes up, “Daddy, daddy”, big cuddles. [PAUL MOONEY]
Usually if there’s a game of football on the telly, phone a couple and just go, instead
of sitting watching in the house yourself, go down to the pub and watch it. Even if you’re not bevvying, you’re still
in amongst everybody getting a laugh and a carry on. [COLIN MCMULLAN]
That’s if your team’s playing well. [laughter] [PAUL MOONEY]
Obviously, Colin doesn’t want to talk about fitba, you know what I mean! [laughter] [COLIN MCMULLAN]
That can be, that can be stressful! [CAPTION
Care for Others Keep in Touch] [ANIMATION ľ the characters are in the pub]
[CHARACTER 1] That. Was one. Rotten day. One. Really. Totally. Rotten. Day. [CHARACTER 2]
Rotten. [CHARACTER 1]
Really, totally, absolutely, rrrrottten! (burp) [CHARACTER 1]
This is gonna be one, rotten day. [CAPTION:
Eat Well. Drink Sensibly.] [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
So, let’s talk about food, and eh, what did you have for breakfast? [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Nothing. Always buyů breakfast, just a cup of tea
and a biscuit in the morning in the way in here, we generally get our tea break half
10, 11 o’clock. It’s breakfast, whether it be sandwiches you
bring or use the canteen. [PAUL MOONEY]
I’d say what sort of mood you’re in but it’s hard to describe what sort of mood makes you
go and eat. But there’s just mornings when you go, “Oh,
I need a fry up”, and other mornings I can sit and get my cornflakes and that’s alright
you know. [COLLIN MCMULLAN]
I think once a week, you’re allowed a blow out once a week. [Paul Mooney: aye] ůthe fry up once a week,
I think. Try and eat a regular balanced diet as you
say, but, you’re allowed a blow up once a week. I don’t feel abstaining the whole time. [PAUL MOONEY]
Fry up’s comfort food, do you know what I mean, just a wee bit, don’t feel likeů ah
I’m going to the canteen so I can get a fry up, makes you feel a wee bit better, it does
me anyway. [laugh] [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
And later in the day do you still feel, does it still make you feel good? [PAUL MOONEY]
[overtalk] Naw, you’re suffering later in the day. [laugh] [IAIN ROLLO]
I think if you eat what you want, but eat less of it, well says me, I don’t know. RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
What about drink? You don’t drink? [CRAIG GUTHRIE]
Yes please. [laugh] [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
How much do you drink and when do you drink? [CRAIG GUTHRIE]
Well, I generally, I don’t drink during the week, but I do take a drink on a Friday night. [COLIN MCMULLAN]
I know people out on the site that have a drink most nights, if not every night, but,
generally myself it’s a night out, but maybe lucky if it’s once a month or less, but I
suppose you’ll call it binge drinking Ĺcos we do go out, we go out, know and enjoy it
butů It’s not, you’re not gonna’ have a lot a drink during the week. Very rarely. [JOHN LOGUE]
It makes me happy I would say, I quite enjoy it, I really do, it’s my, my one vice I would
say. Aye, thoroughly enjoy it. [PAUL MOONEY]
We’re getting older now, aren’t we mate? [laugh] We travelled all overů [Colin McMullan:
speak for yourself eh!] we travelled all over Britain when you were, when you were a bit
younger, and you were out bevvying every night, but you could work it off the next day. Can’t do that now. Just can’t handle it all like that now. So the hangovers kill me now. And I feel rotten, Ĺcos I’ll lie about all
day and I feel as if I’ve lost a day. And that’s what sort of puts me off drinking
as heavy as what I used to. [CAPTION:
Eat Well. Drink Sensibly.] [ANIMATION ľ one character examines the other’s
head with a vacuum cleaner] [CHARACTER 1]
Are you sure you know what you’re doing in there? [CHARACTER 2]
Aye. Of course I do, now just relax. [CHARACTER 1]
Oh! Oh! [CHARACTER 2]
Oh-ohů [CHARACTER 1]
Oooh. Maybe you’d be better leaving this to an expert,
eh? [CHARACTER 2]
Aye. Aye, maybe you’re right. I’m not exactly a brain surgeon am I? [CHARACTER 1]
No, no, but you don’t need to be that, you’re good at fixing vacuum cleaners. [CAPTION:
Do Something You’re Good At Accept Who You Are.] [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
Tell us about the things you’re really good at, what you love doing. [STEPHEN MACKAY]
What I’m really good atů my job. [laugh] I like to think [Paul Mooney: wait
a minute]ů You like to, you like, you like to think you’re good at your job. [SAM FERGUSON]
I think we’re all good at what we do. I think we’re all very understanding people,
then, or we wouldn’t take the job as what we do. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
Michaela how about you? [MICHAELA ROBINSON]
I really love driving, just go on drives, anywhere, [Richard Scothorne: fast?] just
driving. Fast. Oh. No, just relaxing and listening to music and
driving. Yeah. [STEPHEN MACKAY]
Well, Colin thinks, likes to think he’s good at fishing, he thinks going out and spending
ú700 on a new rod is the wee fish gonna go, “Oh there’s a seven hundred pound rod out
there, I’m gonna’ go for this one.” But it doesn’t always work, a lot of the times
you ů [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Stevie’ll try and buy a better snowboard thinkingů [laughter] it works the same, they’re all
the same. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
What are you not so good at? [JOHN LOGUE]
I was gonna say sitting in front of a camera, but, I meanů [laughter] [COLIN MCMULLAN]
I’m not good at houseworků or ironing. I just don’t do that. Housework justů [Michaela: see I’m good at
that I can multitask too.] No. Whereas you find, Stevie’ll tell you at the
site, I, on my area, I always like it tidy. I’ve got a bit of a phobia and my wife can’t
believe it. She says, “How are you not like that in the
house?” Justů I just don’t do housework, it’s not
my thing. [PAUL MOONEY]
My probably biggest bits, I’m not very good at admitting I’m wrong. You wouldn’t believe that, would you? [Laughter] That’s my downfall. [STEPHEN MACKAY]
I’m not very good at hiding my feelings. Definitely not. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
But it sounds important that you hang on to the things that you know you’re good at. [PAUL MOONEY]
If you’re good at something you want to concentrate on that. As Colin said earlier on, we’re out in the
park, there’s a certain job that you’re good at, you want to do that all the time. You don’t want to do something you’re not
good at and somebody saying, “Look at the mess they’re leaving there.” That’s a different pressure again. [Richard Scothorne: uh huh] So you try and
get into the squad that’s doing what you feel comfortable doing. [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Me and Stevie are barred from working with each other. [Laughter] It’s too much hilarity and carry
on. I think it’s just butů the job gets done. It would get done, it’s probably faster than
anything, but, we’re doing the job, we know the job’s to be done so you don’t ů you have
a laugh but you’re not, you’re not not working. [CAPTION:
Do Something You’re Good At Accept Who You Are] [ANIMATION ľ the characters are in a pub]
[CHARACTER 2] Are you sure you’re alright big man? [CHARACTER 1]
Yeah, aye, look I’m good alright, I’m good, good. [CHARACTER 2]
Aw naw, look out, he’s gonna’ blow! [CHARACTER 1]
Could I please have a glass of water? [CAPTION:
Talk About Your Feelings. Ask For Help.] [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
Have any of you cried recently? [PAUL MOONEY]
At a funeral. [Richard Scothorne: uh huh] Just before Christmas. A good friend of mine died, so it’s, I was
carrying the coffin and, aye I was greetin’ that day. Years ago I probably wouldn’t have, but now
I don’t, I’ve just let it go a lot easier than what I would have at one time. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
And did that help? [PAUL MOONEY]
It does help, aye, but I think it’s just different attitudes now. At one time going to a funeral, the woman
greeted, and the guys didn’t. That was just the way it was, but now it’s
a lotů it’s changed. People have moved on. You’ll see a lot more males greetin’ at funerals
than what you would ever, I think anyway, personally. And I think that’s a good thing. [CRAIG GUTHRIE]
I left my wife, last, last year, it was for a brief moment. Em, I found that very hard. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
And did crying help you? [CRAIG GUTHRIE]
It was an outlet, but I’d ended up in such a dark place I didn’t understand why I was
crying. Because I shouldn’t be crying, because I’m
a 48 year old man that works in a shipyard, and I couldn’t understand my own emotions. I didn’t have a grasp on them. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
When you came back into, back to work you’re very open about that andů? [CRAIG GUTHRIE]
Yeah, because I’m telling you that shows how open I’ve been about it. People have, will come up and ask me now,
how I’m getting on, “How’s things?” [STEPHEN MACKAY]
Everybody, whether they admit it or not, if they’re themself, or, in a group, I would
say everybody has a wee greet. [PAUL MOONEY]
Still probably bottle some things up at a film so as you don’t look stupid greetin’
in front of a film or something like that butů [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Oh there’s something in my eye! [laughter] [PAUL MOONEY]
Do you want a cup of tea? [laughter] [COLIN MCMULLAN]
I can’t, I need to go to the toilet. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
So letting your emotions show doesn’t seem like a sign of weakness anymore orů? [PAUL MOONEY]
It depends where it is. You stand out there and greet on that park,
guys are going to say, “What is the script with him?” And probably half of them would walk away
from you, Ĺcos they wouldn’t know how to deal with it. ĹCos it just, “That guy’s breaking down,
he’s standing there roaring and greeting”. But the guy might have just had a phone call
or something, you don’t know until you actually go and talk to them. But I would say as Colin’ll tell ye, he’s
out the park an all, probably what? 75 per cent would walk away from you, run
away from you, until somebody actually went over and found out what was wrong. [STEPHEN MACKAY]
They don’t know what to say, they don’t know how to approach them. If you see somebody crying out there, you’re
just like, “Phew what do I say?” Do you know what I mean? At the end of the day, us being out here,
we’ve got to be mentally strong orů [PAUL MOONEY]
[overtalk] Got be a rough, big rough, tough, rough construction workerů [STEPHEN MACKAY]
Aye you’ve got to be rough, rough and tough or [Paul Mooney: it’s no fair] you’re putting
lives, lives in danger at the end of the day. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
Has it ever felt all too much for anyone? [PAUL MOONEY]
Och aye, every second day. [laughter] No really, it’s, your coping strategies
kick in. You never get to that stage, well I’ve never
got to that stage where you’ve just to say, “enough’s enough.” I think we’ve all got, some sort of venting
system where we get it out our system. That’ll bring you back to a level where, it
might not be perfect but we can get on with everything. [CAPTION:
Talk About Your Feelings. Ask for Help.] [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
So I’ve got here something for you. The smartest tool in the box, have you ever
seen one of these? [Richard produces a plastic human brain from
a toolbox] [PAUL MOONEY]
Aye at school, hundreds of year ago. [STEPHEN MACKAY]
Some of us only have half of that. [PAUL MOONEY]
There you go then. [laughter] [CRAIG GUTHRIE]
Controls everything doesn’t it. Stress levels, emotions, the lot. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
How important a tool is that? [COLIN MCMULLAN]
It’s the most important [Paul Mooney: it is] tool in the box isn’t it. [PAUL MOONEY]
Aye. If you don’t put your brain in gear, and you’re
beat aren’t you? From the minute you get out of your bed in
the morning. [RICHARD SCOTHORNE]
Do you think you look after it? [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Yeah. [PAUL MOONEY]
Probably not 100 per cent the way we should, but aye, I think reasonably. [STEPHEN MACKAY]
Do Something You’re Good At. [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Keep Active. [JOHN LOGUE]
Care for Others. [MICHAELA ROBINSON]
Eat Well. [IAIN ROLLO]
Drink Sensibly. [PAUL MOONEY]
Talk About Your Feelings. [CRAIG GUTHRIE]
Ask For Help. [SAM FERGUSON]
Accept Who You Are. [STEPHEN MACKAY]
Keep In Touch. [COLIN MCMULLAN]
Take A Break. [ANIMATION]
[CHARACTERS 1 and 2] Look after the smartest tool in the box. [CAPTION:
Ahead for health Looking after the smartest tool in the box.] [CREDIT:
Many thanks to everyone who helped us produce this DVD: BAE Systems, Naval Ships, Brookfield
Multiplex, Mercury, Dunne and UCATT. Icons supplied by the Mental Health Foundation.] [END OF TRANSCRIPT]

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