American Theatre Wing: Behind the Scenes

American Theatre Wing: Behind the Scenes


[MUSIC]. Hello, I’m Tom Schumacher, President and
Producer of Disney Theatrical Group, but I’m here today for the American Theatre
Wing. The American Theatre Wing has produced
over 300 episodes of working in the theater, but today is going to be a bit
of a change of pace. As a producer, I’m well aware that it
takes a small army of almost invisible people to make a show happen eight times
a week. Now my favorite part of making theater is
working with the creative group to make the original production.
But after opening night, we leave the theater and it’s left to these
extraordinary people backstage who make it happen eight times a week, just as it
happened on opening night. And today we want to take a look at some
of those people. Now, we certainly can’t cover every area
of the theater in one episode, but we can do some of them.
So today, we’re going to meet the makeup department.
We’re going to meet the wig department. We’re going to meet the puppet
department. We’re going to meet the wardrobe
department, and take an extraordinary look inside one player in the orchestra
pit. Now our great studio here at CUNY has
been taken over today. It’s a little bit like the drama club
meets a science fair. So come with me and let’s take a little
look behind the curtain. [SOUND] So, here we are in a makeup room,
and we’re going to take a look at a pretty extraordinary makeup.
But let’s start with the two people that I’m actually with.
First, in the chair here is our actress Tshidi Manye, who plays Rafiki eight
nights a week in The Lion King. How are you, Tshidi?>>I’m doing good and how are you doing?>>I’m good.
Are you comfortable with this experience today?>>Yes, I am, yes I am.>>Now at the end we want to talk about what
it’s like to sit in a chair and be made up with so much make up.>>Alright.>>But first, I’m turning now to Elizabeth
Cohen, who actually runs our make up department there on the Lion King.
Now, when did you start working on the Lion King?>>14 years ago when it started.
I was in Minneapolis with the show and moved to Broadway.>>Now, were a make up artist before that?>>I was an artist I’d consider myself and a
theater artist, but I, I have a, more of an art background, studio arts.
So I have a painting background and I had worked on, off Broadway shows.>>And did you, did you train in cosmetology
or any of that kind of stuff?>>I didn’t. I just had had theatrical training in
college of just basics and.>>And how did we find you?>>I happened to go to college with the original make-up supervisor.>>So the journey to come to Broadway
actually was through people you’d gone to school with.>>Networking[LAUGH].>>And the makeup we’re going to do today
was designed by Michael Ward, right? And you worked directly with Michael when
you did this, right?>>Yeah, absolutely.>>So Michael Ward’s a British lighting, a make up designer.>>And hair.>>And hair, that we, that works with us on
the show. So now let’s talk first about this, this
idea of you’re going to do this every night an actor needs to get made up.
You’re using a very specific design that you have to follow.>>Right.>>So let’s start first with the tools
you’re going to use. What makeup is used in The Lion King to
get.>>Well.>>And if you want to start, you can do that.>>We use a variety of makeups depending on
the character. Rafiki makeup was specifically designed
with Fardel, which is a water-based makeup, which comes in a cream and a
liquid formulation, but is extremely bright colors and the.>>And these products haven’t changed while
we’ve been doing the Lion King?>>things have evolved some, but we have been using the same products since the
beginning, and then adding to them.>>And your brush here actually, that’s a big brush, Tshidi.
[LAUGH].>>That’s, that’s a lot of face to cover with this brush.
So the brush looks like a brush I’d be using at home.>>Yeah.
The brushes that, most of the brushes I use on Rafiki and some brushes that we
use on other characters are actually bought at an arts supply store, not a
makeup shop at all.>>These aren’t makeup brushes.>>I have a, like two or three make up brushes I use on Rafiki, but because this
paint is so, it’s almost like water color or acrylic, it works best with art studio
brush.>>And I see you’ve actually started to sketch in on her some of this outline.>>Yeah.>>How long will this whole make up take you
to do?>>In the theater, it’s a 30 minute make up, we have exactly 30 minutes to accomplish
it. Some do it in less time, but that’s the
amount of time we have for it. In a studio where I’m trying to make it
look camera ready, it might take 40 minutes.
but it’s a 30 minute makeup.>>I see. And when do you arrive at the theater
every night, to get made up?>>I get to the theater by if the show is at 7:00, I have to be there by at least
quarter to, 6:00.>>Quarter to 6:00?>>Quarter to 7:00.>>So you need an hour an 15 minutes?>>Yes.>>Yes, to get ready.>>For everything.>>For everything.>>We have, three characters, three actors who, their call time is the hour before
the show, because we have so many makeups in the show that they have to start three
people.>>Well, well there are 51 people all together in the Lion King.>>Right.>>But most of them do their own makeup.>>Right.
All the ensemble does their makeup, and that’s part of my job to teach them how
to do that. And give them the tools that they need in
this, and the, simplest instructions that I can give them to accomplish the design
that they need to accomplish. And the ensemble makeups are very, very
simple, for the most part, but they’re very graphic.>>But how many then, how many makeups for
that, for The Lion King have to be done in the makeup room?>>we do three each, we have three crew
members, so each of us does three principals.>>There’s three people on the crew?>>Yeah, and we each do three principals in
the room.>>The assistant supervisor also goes down and helps Pumbaa with his makeup in his
own room, although he does some of it himself, and then they do.>>What are you doing in the chair while
she’s painting you? Do you want to start painting her?>>Let’s do that.>>Let’s see that a little.
What are you doing when this is happening?>>We are just sitting.
Sometimes we have like, you know, discussions that depend on what the
discussion is about on that day. You know, you talk about your traveling,
how was your traveling, what made you upset or who did what in the train, and
stuff like that.>>So, so is Elizabeth your, your confessor, your therapist, your,[LAUGH] is that part
of your job?>>It really is, actually.>>It is.>>And vice versa. I mean.>>because this is a very intimate
relationship.>>It is.>>Yes, it is.>>I mean, you literally spend 30 to 45 minutes this close to somebody.>>You certainly know what each other have
eaten for dinner.>>Yes, definitely, definitely.>>[LAUGH] Yes, that’s for sure. Or in this case, breakfast.>>[LAUGH][LAUGH] You just say excuse me
today, I just had a lot of garlic so, in case this is garlic bread.>>And we do keep these around to offer each
other.>>Yep.>>Oh, everyone gets to have their own mint in case there’s a, a.>>Yep.>>Yeah, and usually we reciprocate you
know, or if, if somebody needs one, we both take one.>>And, do you ever just want to sit and be
left alone? Do you need to communicate that with each
other? Sometimes if you don’t feel like talking
you just you know, just sit there and just close your eyes and just, it’s not
like.>>And, and, and dream?>>And just dream.>>And dream? Because this makeup is.>>Some times you fall asleep.>>I do fall asleep, it’s really like
soothing sometimes. It’s like you know gives you time to
meditate, because sometimes we need to.>>Well, I’m going to leave the two of you to keep painting and we’re going to come
back and look at what happens.>>Yes.>>At the end of this extraordinary make up.>>Yes.>>So I’m just going to let, Elizabeth, thank you.>>Thank you.
[MUSIC] So like all producers, I left the room while the real work was being done.
So let’s take a look, Elizabeth. You, now Tshidi is ready.
How long did this take you to do this?>>It’s about a 30 minute job, maybe 40, depending on the care taken for the
camera.>>And how much touch up are you going to have to do on this?>>Well, for the theater, I wouldn’t do any
unless something catastrophic happened.>>During the course of the show you wouldn’t touch it up?>>No, Tshidi is very careful.
we don’t powder her, which would set this makeup.>>Mm-hm.>>but she doesn’t sweat, if she were to
sweat it would activate the water based paints, so we would have to counter touch
it up with powder.>>And on a matinee day, do you take it off, and put it back?>>I don’t take it off on the matinee,
because I’m not do, I don’t go out.>>You don’t go to lunch with this makeup on?>>I just buy food.
[LAUGH] You know what, I should.>>No you shouldn’t. No you shouldn’t.
This is great. Thank you for demonstrating this for us
today.>>You’re welcome.>>And thank you, Tshidi for being here on your special off duty.
I never noticed there was gold on the lips.>>Yup.>>That’s great, thank you.
[MUSIC]>>That’s the make-up department.>>Thank you.>>Thank you. [SOUND]>>Here we are, we’re now in the wig room.
And this is a simulation, really, of what would happen normally backstage on a
show, because on a show you, you, you, in some cases there are hundreds of wigs,
and it’s like a gigantic beauty parlor. But it all starts with the wig designer,
or the hair designer, in this case. And I’m here with David Brian Brown.
Now he’s done a pile of Broadway shows. You have Follies running right now.
What else is running of yours?>>Sister Act, Chicago.>>You’ve been doing this for how long?>>since 1979.>>Since 1979?>>Well, I’ve been on Broadway since 1979.>>Congratulations.>>I’ve been designing for the past 16 years.>>The the thing about wigs that I think is
fascinating is their extraordinary complexity as a, as a piece of goods.
let’s pull in, because what people should see is, this is what a wig looks like
before it actually gets set, right?>>Right. After it’s made by the wig maker, it
arrives raw.>>And where does this hair come from?>>Well it comes from all over. I get most of my hair from, from Europe.>>From Europe?
So, there are bald women performing on Broadway every night.
How nice for them.>>[LAUGH] Now just, I’ll hold this one. Show me what this is going to become when
you actually have set it.>>Alright. And this is an identical match.>>This is the exact hair right, same way.>>The exact wig.>>It was actually done for a show that
people were playing twins. So that’s why I have two exact.
so this was before, this is after it has been set.
Well.>>Yeah that’s extraordinary, I’m just, just the level of detail.
Now, how long can this, this you’ve designed this wig, right?>>Uh-huh.>>But how long can it keep that shape?>>Maybe two performances, actually.>>You could get two whole performances out
of it.>>Yeah.>>So then it has to be washed like this.>>Doesn’t have to be washed, it just needs to be reset.>>To be reset, okay.>>It needs to be washed about once a week.>>Let’s put these down because I want to
show what a wig looks like when it’s actually being made.
Because these are custom made for people, right?>>Yes.>>So I’ll hold this one for you.
So you would custom, so this is being custom made to someone’s head.>>Right, everything is custom-made to to
exactly fit their head, their hairline, which you can see traced right here so
their hair line from point of right is here, and then all of this lace some of
this is going to get cut away and some of this is going to sit on their forehead
right?>>That’s correct.>>Anchors the wig?>>It’s all hand-mounted, individually.>>Like a rug.>>Like a rug.>>So to speak.>>With a tiny[LAUGH].>>A tiny little hook, a tiny little hook.>>A tiny little hook, and and literally they’re, they’re individually tied, one
by one.>>Each hair, how many hairs?>>I’ve never counted. [LAUGH]>>No one knows, right?
OKay.>>No.>>Well so, clearly this is a complicated thing.
Let’s put this one down and let’s bring in Gary Martori.
Now, Gary Martori actually runs the hair department, right?
In this case, you’re running actually hair department on Mary Poppins.>>Yes.>>So, did you go to cosmetology school?>>Yes.
Yeah, early, early 80’s, I did. Yeah.>>So, so you actually could run a real
beauty parlor.>>Yes.>>You could be your own Steel Magnolias and do that.>>[LAUGH] Yes.>>And you have to then set the wigs, do all
that.>>[CROSSTALK] What time does your day start?>>For an eight o’clock show I would be in
sometimes three or four in the afternoon.>>To get everybody’s hair ready.>>Yes.>>And then you run the show? [CROSSTALK] You get actors in their hair,
out of their hair?>>Out of their hair, quick-changes. Most of the time it’s between, it’s
before seven, between three and seven is just getting everything ready for that
night.>>And then everyone arrives.>>At 7, 7:30.>>Well let’s have someone arrive right now.>>Right.>>Let’s take our chair, and let’s bring in Broadway legend Michelle Lookadoo.>>[LAUGH].>>Now how many shows have we done together,
Michelle?>>I’ve done three Disney Shows on Broadway.>>Three Disney shows. And you look fantastic.
Your hair is so natural here.>>Thank you.>>So let’s tear it off. [LAUGH] There you are.
There you are. And you’re in a wig cap, so now Gary,
tell me how this preparation has gone.>>We, we actually pink curl her head every single night of show or sometimes they do
themselves. And we put them in a wig cap, and we
protect the hair of the wig as well as her own with a wig cap.
So they could pink curl just like these ones.>>And how long does it take, Michelle, for
you to get in that?>>How’s your pink curls?>>About six minutes.>>Six minutes? You’ve got it down?>>[LAUGH] And so she would stay in this all
night long?>>This would stay the whole night long but her wigs would change throughout the
night for looks and costumes, and whatever she’s wearing.>>Right.>>So let’s try.
Michelle, you played Ariel for us on Broadway?>>I did.>>And there you appeared.
And this is such an iconic look. And I, I just want us to notice the
extraordinary power that, of the transformation of this hair.
How it instantly turns you into a very iconic character.
It’s a good color for you too. [LAUGH] It’s not particularly natural,
but it’s a good color. [LAUGH] And let’s look at how far down
your face that lace comes. Actually, Gary, can you touch where the
lace is?>>Yeah, because it’s all the way down there, right?>>Oh, yeah.>>But that, for the most part, we hope the
audience doesn’t.>>Audience doesn’t see a lot.>>Doesn’t see that.>>And you don’t, you never see that on the stage.>>That looks so.>>It gets cleaned every night and redone
every night.>>This, wig would have to get cleaned every Mm-hmm.>>The lace would get cleaned would get
cleaned, every night. [CROSSTALK]>>Does it feel secure when it’s pinned into
your head?>>Mm-hmm, absolutely.>>Better she’s not in skates. [LAUGH]>>Yeah in this case, yeah, you were rolling
around, so, that looks so fantastic on you[MUSIC].>>Well before you pin her into it though,
there you are. You know, you’re so pretty even in a wig
cap. Okay.>>Aw.
Thank you.>>I know I love you. Okay, so there’s Ariel floating away,
swimming away. And then here we come.
And what time period is this supposed to be, David?>>This is early 30’s.
Could be late 20’s, but early 30’s. [COUGH] That is fantastic.
Now let’s let’s go all the way brunette, before we finish with Michelle.
And here she loses her hair once again, in this horrible ritual.
[LAUGH] Now, how many wig changes might somebody make in a show?
When you were in Mermaid, you were, with, you were on as Ariel, you had how many
wigs?>>two.>>Two or three? Two.>>Two Ariel wigs.>>And then when you were a Mersister, you’d
wear the, you had to take the wig on and off to be various fish.>>Yeah.>>The brunette look is kind of scary with
you. It’s very dramatic.>>[LAUGH] I think my hair was this color in
college.>>Oh,[LAUGH] I’ve always thought you were a natural blond.
[LAUGH] Really? Well, you pull off the natural blond look
great. So David, in a show, or Gary actually, in
Poppins, did somebody change their wigs over and over and over and over and over
again?>>Yes, they ensemble. They have at least four or five different
looks throughout the whole entire show.>>So how many wigs are in, like, a show like Mary Poppins backstage?>>On a nightly basis it’s, like, 54 wigs
per show every night.>>And how many wigs are you maintaining?>>Sometimes like 80, 80 wigs with swings and other understudies.>>huh, that are, in, involved, covering the
show.>>Yeah. [MUSIC].
[MUSIC]>>Okay Michelle, you look fantastic as a brunette, you can stay brunette for a
while. You get to go.>>[LAUGH] And now we get to bring in, for a
whole different idea, let’s bring in another Broadway legend, this is Tyler
Maynard, who everybody knows on Broadway.>>Hi everybody.>>And Tyler, you’ve got a whole kind of yo, yo, Keanu Reeves look going on here.>>[LAUGH] Yeah, yeah, this is my normal
this is your normal look.>>This is your normal look.>>Everyday.>>People don’t know that you actually do look like that in real life.
Does it feel like you could,>>Yeah, it’s so secure, yeah. You could, you could work it?
And, and, and let’s talk about facial hair, because facial hair seems so
difficult. Some of the actors just prefer to grow
their own.>>Some do.>>But if you’re in the ensemble and you have to keep changing, you can’t.>>Right, sometimes it’s facial hair.>>So how is his facial hair attached?>>Right now we use spirit gum.
Sometimes we use double sided tape. And it comes right off.>>And, can we just see it come right off?
Is he going to cry?>>Yeah, it’s not bad at all.>>Now, look at that. That’s, now, this wig is really
beautiful, you know, there’s a fear that men are going to look, unnatural in a
wig. But, can we actually just see what Tyler
looks like? And then also see his wig prep, oh Tyler,
Tyler. Mm-hm>>Tyler doesn’t have any hair.
[LAUGH]>>That is, it’s an extraordinary, extraordinary transformation.
Can we try, can you put that one on? I’m just curious, because this actually,
tell me if this is what you looked like when you were in college.
[LAUGH]>>This is what I looked like about four years ago, actually four, five years ago,
this was my hairstyle. [LAUGH]>>Isn’t that fantastic, how the, the, it is
right back there. [CROSSTALK][LAUGH]>>Would you like David to loan this to you?
Is that what you’re saying?>>May be some tears when you take it off. [CROSSTALK][LAUGH]>>But it is, what I find so compelling
about hair is, you know, in a show, we have to see the same actors over and over
and over again, unlike a movie, you can’t keep changing the people in, and so the
constant transformation on stage, and it it is pretty profound.
So I’m sorry Tyler we’re we’re done with our wig segment here with Gary and David
and.>>I’m going to take this.>>Your going to, you, you can wear that for the rest of the day.
Thank you Tyler that was great. So, after the show, how long do you have
to stay in the dressing room, cleaning up?>>I stay at least 45 minutes to an hour
sometimes.>>To maintain things.>>Yeah.>>And when a show is touring, what do you do when all this hair gets taken off
people and then you have to go on the road?
You have to pack it up that day.>>We have road boxes that are specially made for all these wigs, and David’s done
it, we have done it lots of times.>>And if the hair is wet, what do you do?>>we have to we have dryers that the come, we take with us.
We travel with everything with us.>>And it just all travels with you?>>Well, yeah. I had eight road boxes for Marry Poppins,
when I was on tour.>>On the road?>>You know, with wig ovens and everything in it.>>And David, when I saw Spamalot, which you
did, I recall that women actually had hair under their arms.
Did you have to make that? [LAUGH]>>Yes.>>Is that the wig department too?>>Yep.>>So you’ve actually done armpit hair?>>Yep.
because sometimes you, you fight with the makeup department on and on.>>On who gets to control it?>>Yeah, facial hair or armpit hair.
We’re a market.>>Well, it’s nice that you’re soup to nuts, pits to head.>>[LAUGH] Thank you, gentlemen.>>You’re welcome.>>And that’s the wig department.
[SOUND] So, now we’re going to take a look at the puppet department.
Now, most people probably think, puppet department?
Who has a puppet department? Well, right now on Broadway the Lion King
has a puppet department. War Horse, up at Lincoln Center, has a
very large puppet department. And off Broadway there’s Avenue Q with
puppets. And even right now as we’re filming this
downtown we’re about to, there’s a show about to open.
Arias with a Twist with a puppeteer. Basil Twist, who has an entire show using
puppets. So puppets are a very major part of the
theater. But on a big Broadway show, that takes a
puppet department to maintain and manage those.
Now this here, to my left, is Ilya Vett. Hi Ilya.>>Hi, how you doing Thomas?>>So, how long have you been on The Lion
King?>>I’ve been working full time at The Lion King for the past eight years.>>Eight years.
And how many people are on the puppet crew?>>We have a puppet crew of three people
that we have one day worker who does all of the maintenance that gets done every
day.>>And we have me and the head of the department that switch our schedule so
that somebody is always there for the show, during the show, in case there’s a
malfunction or something that needs to be addressed.
We’re there to handle it, and then the other one does the day to day works of
the fittings and the, the, maintaining the shop and keeping all of the repairs
up to schedule.>>So what was your journey to get this job?>>my my mother just happened to be a costume designer.
And when I was a child, the Muppets were very popular.
And my mother figured, well, let’s just make some puppets for you.
So we designed and built our own characters, and used to have our own
little puppet shows and play around. And then there was a long period of my
life where I didn’t address or play with puppets anymore and>>And they thought you had become normal
again.>>Right. [LAUGH] And then , actually I came into
the city to get into the wardrobe department, and I’ve always had a love of
The Lion King. And my mother bought me the book when it
first opened, and I always had a fascination of the, the amount of work.>>So you came to Broadway to work in the
wardrobe, or as people think of it the costume.>>Right, the costume department.
[CROSSTALK]>>Department, to be on the course of running costumes for the show.>>Right, and>>But did you do that?>>I, I not really, I kind of fell right
into The Lion King, and Beauty and the Beast, doing a lot of their craftwork
calls, and a lot of the dealing with the puppets and, and because that’s where I
my passion is.>>Well, let’s let’s start with first because I want to do two different
puppets, and the one in the show that’s the most straight up.
Beautifully designed by Julie Taymor, sculpted by her.
Of course, our director of our show, and the creator of the puppets with Michael
Curry, a fantastic puppet maker as well.>>So, this is Zazu. Now, we’re going to introduce Thom
Warren, who actually is in The Lion King, and actually plays both of these
characters which he covers. And he’s been with us for a very long,
when did you start with us?>>nine years ago.>>Nine years ago, he’s a veteran. Now, let’s, can you get Zazu up?>>Yep.>>And then let’s talk about, because,
there’s an aspect of this, which is obviously the, the actor.
In this case, a trained actor, is now coming to this as a puppeteer.
But were a puppeteer before you had this job?>>No I was not.
I was trained to work these particular puppets after being hired.>>So now can you, Ilya, can you tell me the
different parts of Zazu and how he works?>>Sure.>>Eyes and mouth and.>>Well Zazu has an actual hard body and a hard head and the neck.>>So many do.>>Is a little[LAUGH] is a little bit of a
wonky neck that can move around, so he has some movement.
And inside of the head itself, there is actually an eye mechanism, which is
controlled by the thumb, you can see here.
By pushing down and up on the thumb, it causes a lever inside of the head to
manipulate the lids to open and close.>>Mm-hm.>>And there’s also just a trigger like a pistol grip that causes the mouth to
open, and this has cables that run down, and into this trigger itself that makes
all of that manipulation happen. And it takes the puppeteer to be able to
maneuver and manipulate all of those functions.>>And what about the wings?
So those flap as well, right?>>Yes, the wings are done with the left hand, and it’s a paddle that you pull
down on the side and it has these armatures that pull back the wings and
cause them to actually flap if you just, flap around.
[MUSIC]>>I don’t want to ruin the illusion for anybody, but how many Zazus are actually
backstage right now?>>We actually have three Zazus on deck, and one that’s in the wings, like.>>Is this contoured to, in the case of Thom
here, is this contoured to his hand. Is everything, do have it, your own
special tensions and do you adjust during the show?>>there’s no adjustments that we do during
the show, but when we get a new actor or somebody that comes in, and is going to
be using the puppet, we find the puppet that they feel the most comfortable with.
And for instance with this puppet, Thom and Jeff both used the same bird.
And we can’t custom-fit each person, because you have to have a swing and have
to be able.>>Be able to, okay.>>Able to to have all the people work it. But you have to find a medium between all
of the different aspects that each actor appreciates and likes in their own.>>Now let’s put Zazu back because I want to
get Thom, and Thom you’re going to have to come around the front here.>>Okay.>>Because we want to get you into Scar.>>Now, the thing to think about with Scar,
is that, actually if you hand me the head while I’m talking.>>Yeah.>>Great.
Because, when you think about Scar, and Neal, you come around front too, because
we have to get him in to his rig, right?>>Mm-hm.>>Now, you can start that.>>Alright.>>because this is actually just a mask, right?
I mean, when you think about it, it’s a mask that now Thom has to actually
puppet. So what are you putting on now?>>This is his head mount that we have
that’s a, made off of a life cast of his head.>>And it’s so that it’s really strong and
rigid on the top and we have a rubber that comes around to be soft and pliable.>>Uh-huh.>>So that his can still sing.>>And what’s on his hips?>>And on the hips we have, attached to the
top of this boom, we have two motors that actually manipulate and make the
mechanics work on it. We have one motor that comes up and is
attached to the boom here, that makes the arm come up and down.>>Can you make that go right now?>>I have to power it up.>>You have to power him up?>>And then, on this side, we have the mask
motor that actuates the top part of the mask.
And we have a battery, and these are control units that adjust the different
placements and speeds and, and>>This is a, were you into electronics when you started this?
no, I I just kind of learned it from doing it.
I came in and out of.>>You were taught how to work all of this? Yeah,>>Cause this is really kind of, now, let’s
do this. Can you make the head move first?
We’ll look and see what that does.>>That’s without the mask on.>>Now we do want to put the mask on in there.>>Sure, and then you just step down.
Then we put the mask on.>>Now this looks like it could go terribly wrong.>>[LAUGH] Tom, have you had this go wrong
during the show?>>I have. [LAUGH]>>And what happens when it goes wrong?>>Well, it’s usually actor error, and I’ll
have it slide down my face, scrape the makeup off, or sometimes it’s mechanical
and a wire trips, and the mask.>>So show us the range a little.>>Well, this, this can typically happen if something is going wrong.>>Alright, so show us the range of movement
he can do. What can you do with him?>>So he can come down, show the more animal
instincts of the character. [MUSIC] And then he can come back up.>>And what do you, can you show us your
hand?>>Yeah. So I’ve got a finger control.>>On the hand, he has the finger control,
and on the finger control, there’s two ac-, sliders, which are actually
potentiometers. And basically what.>>Potentiometer?>>A potentiometer, yes.>>Did you learn that word today for this
presentation?>>No, no that’s what they’re called.>>That’s fantastic.>>basically what it is, is just a slider that allows the position of whatever his
hand finger slider goes to. There is an actual potentiometer and
slider inside the motor, so that as he moves each of these sliders, it moves the
motor a certain amount of distance inside the box, and all that’s adjusted by the
control box.>>And are you in the wings for Thom, so that if he has a problem, he.>>Yes.
We’re, we’re on call during the show, so that if there’s an issue with the Scar
mechanic and something happens, that we come down and we address it and we fix
it.>>And, and how often does that happen?>>Unfortunately, more than you’d want. You know, it, it happens.>>Really?
After all these years?>>Yes it’s. Usually it’s something that’s a small
glitch, or something, but, but they’re finicky and they’re electronic, so that
there’s, there’s always a little glitch somewhere.
But most of the times it gets hammered out without the audience[CROSSTALK] even
aware.>>Even knowing. And are these heavy for you?>>they’re not light.
[LAUGH] Yeah, yeah, we feel them.>>You feel it?>>Yeah.>>And do you know when the head is misbehaving, or does, does Ilya have to
tell you the head’s misbehaving?>>Sometimes we know and sometimes we don’t. I can usually see from my scene partner’s
face if the thing is going like this, somebody’s usually laughing at me.>>Oh, someone’s laughing at you and you
know it shouldn’t be there. And Ilya, are you actually watching the
wings, or do you kind of know when you need?>>we have a monitor.>>You have a monitor in your department?>>Yes, up in the puppet room we, in the
puppet shop, we have a monitor and sound to the house.>>And we also can hear them calling the
show, So if there’s an, a problem, and say stage management sees it, they’ll
start talking with each other about, do you notice this, do you notice that.
And we’ll hear it before they even call us.>>Right.>>So we’ll be able to get a jump on.>>Well I think, what, one of the things
about this, and why I’m so glad you guys came to demonstrate this is, most people
think of puppets as a very simple manipulative thing.
And we’ve seen both with Zazu and certainly this.
There’s a lot more technology and a gigantic piece of maintenance that’s
going on to keep the show alive back stage.
So, Ilya, thank you, Thom thank you and again, we’re going to move on.
There are some truly unsung heroes back stage on any show, and that’s the
wardrobe department. And the wardrobe department is
complicated because it’s taking care of costumes, but also taking care of actors.
They move quickly around that stage dodging scenery, dodging actors, dodging
everything to keep the show flowing. So lets take a look at what wardrobe
department actually does. Now I’m here with Carly Hirschberg, hi
Carly.>>Hi, how are you?>>So you’re a dresser on Broadway.>>I am.>>And you work in the wardrobe department. So what happens in your day?
Because there’s two real parts of your day.>>Yes.
Well, I do day work for Mary Poppins as well as dressing the show.>>What does day work mean?>>That entails doing ironing and prep work
for the clothes, checking everything, making sure everything is safe, and it
looks great.>>What does safe mean?>>Well, shoes, for example, can have safety issues if, you know, taps were loose, or
elastic is loose or rubber is not glued down properly.
So we go through everything with a fine tuned.>>Fine-toothed comb.>>Fine-toothed comb, to make sure
everything looks really great and there are no safety issues whatsoever, which is
very important because our actors are on stage the whole time and they’re working
out really hard.>>And what do you mean prep the show? What does that mean when you get ready to
actually have the show happen?>>Well, after day work happens, after we’ve cleaned the clothes, made everything look
good, everything set inside the dressing rooms or in the bunker, in gondolas,
prepped for the show.>>So the bunker would mean like where the ensemble goes to change their clothes?>>Absolutely.
Underneath the stage, in our case, at Mary Poppins, and that’s where we do all
the storage for those clothes, there, as well.>>Now where does Mary actually get dressed,
though?>>Mary has her own dressing room, which is very nice.
It is Mary Poppins, after all. And in that room we contain all of her
clothes for the show. And then, during my part of the day, I
will also take those clothes out and prep them either backstage or downstairs in
the bunker, or wherever we need them.>>To preset them.>>Presets for our quick-changes or just fast changes or moments in the stage of
the show.>>So, when she can’t go back to her, her, her dressing room.>>When she can’t get back to the dressing
room. And since it’s Mary Poppins, she’s on
stage most of the time, so that’s often the case. [MUSIC]>>And then when she’s on stage where are
you?>>When she’s on stage, I’m backstage and I’m usually waiting in, in a preset area
for her to meet me offstage, so we can do a change or we could use water or hang
out for a little bit.>>Now you have a tool belt on.>>I do.>>And what kind of stuff is in your tool belt?>>Well, it’s a little mix of everything.
I have a shoe horn if we ever need it.>>Uh-huh.>>For shoe changes. I have some sewing supplies like
scissors,>>In case you want to make a sweater? What are you doing?
[LAUGH] It’s for repairing, right?>>For repairs, or if there was a string that we could see on stage, she comes
off, we’ll kind of get rid of the thread if we can, you know, just to make things
look really neat. And in case of emergencies, you know, if
there are some shoes that have elastic laces, if they got stuck during a quick
change, I’d have to cut them off and then replace the laces.
So I have laces in here too. you know, just the, the.>>You’re ready.>>In case of emergencies situation.>>And stuff.
And where did you come from, because you, I know you did theater early in your
career.>>Yes.>>We didn’t find you from another show.>>No. No, this is my first Broadway production.
prior to this it was actually in textile design in New York, which was very
exciting and very fun, but definitely a different lifestyle choice, nine to five,>>Well, now let’s take a look at, we’re
going to ask Elisabeth Derosa to come in, who plays Mary Poppins in our show.
You cover the role, here you are you look so beautiful in the costume.>>Thank you.>>And I want everyone to see this costume.
Can you take just a little turn around. Because Carly and Janet and Gary here,
are going to actually demonstrate with us, a full on Mary Poppins quick change.
Now, set this up for us because you’re, you’re wearing this dress.>>That’s right.>>In the, the Jolly Holiday number.>>Mm-hmm.
In the scene and in the song Jolly Holiday, Mary is dressed like this.
However, it is important to note that before that song, after the very first
song in the show, Mary has to change from her boots.>>Now, yeah, this is interesting.
You’re not actually wearing the period boots.
This is a Bob Curley costume. Bob Curley designed all of our sets and
costumes for the show.>>Yes.>>But Bob designed a period boot.>>Yes, he did.>>But you can’t wear that in the Jolly Holiday sequence because why?>>Because as you’ll see when I come off of
Jolly Holiday, or come out of the park scene in Jolly Holiday into the number,
she has to wear this lovely pink outfit that we see here.>>That we’ve crumpled on the floor, yeah.>>[LAUGH] It’s such a quick change that
they’d be no way.>>Lacing the boot.>>To unlace her boots and to re-lace.>>So you’re cheating.>>Exactly.>>These are your cheater shoes.>>It’s a cheat. And we hope that no one notices that
these are not boots.>>Well, after all these years I hadn’t noticed until today.>>>[LAUGH] Now my other question is, you’re
on stage, but you’re actually exiting behind a piece of scenery for the quick
change. So you’re going to actually start the
quick change.>>That’s right.>>Not in view of the audience, but on stage.>>Exactly, actually it starts center stage,
believe it or not. as the scenery, they’re called sliders,
as they move off stage right, I will be moving behind along with them, and
preparing myself to change, which means opening the coat and opening my shirt,
and getting, peeling back the layers.>>So it’s.>>Yes.>>You’re starting to open everything up, so that when you walk off to do it.
Okay, I’m going to step out of this scene.
Now, Gary, don’t you have to put that hat on prepare?
So Gary wears the hat, you’re going to go back where you belong as if you were
exiting, Carly’s going to do this. I’m going to bring Janet in as I exit,
and we’re going to run this Mary Poppins quick change in real time.
Everyone ready?>>Sounds good. Yes.>>All right.>>Here we go.
I’m exiting. [MUSIC]>>That was fantastic.
And what was great is that we got to see you actually drop the lipstick.>>Yes[LAUGH].>>Now, well of course it does, because it’s
in real flow and it’s back stage.>>Right.>>Now you would have to run on whether you could change it or not, the lipstick.
You have to go. So you’ve got new hat, new dress, and
none of this is tear-away because you’ve got to be able to dance in this stuff.>>That’s right.
Right. Full dance numbers.>>So, you’re going to go off like you do in
the show, and we’re actually going to watch you put the clothes back on again
in the same real time change that you do. [MUSIC]>>That was fantastic.
So tell me, you had to change her hose.>>Yes.>>She went from black to white to black again.>>Yes.>>Right?
And what’s the hardest part of this change?>>Oh, the hardest part?
Well you know sometimes the very center back snaps can be a little tricky.
And it’s a little different for each Mary that’s on.
So, there can be just a lot of.>>You’re kind of out of breath right now.>>I know. It’s quick.
It really is quick. And so you’re just kind of like, you’ve
got to go with the flow, see what it feels like.
Make sure the actor’s comfortable and also, you know, just really get her into
her clothes, properly.>>And have you ever messed it up? Oh, I once got one sock stuck inside the
other sock, and so there was a nice little lump.
that was the, the classic.>>Oh yeah, yeah. She had a whole lump for the whole
number?>>She had a lump for a portion of the number.
It was not my favorite stage moment for me.>>Well, these things happen.>>But it was a new day.>>Well, that was fantastic.
And Elizabeth was great and I, I want to watch that all happen again.
But I’m not going to make you do it, because it will put you out of breath.
But I think we can see what it is about the wardrobe department because it’s very
intimate. It’s very pressured backstage.
And it’s absolutely these three different things of prepping during the day,
setting up the show, and then helping manage the life of that actor backstage.
That’s the wardrobe department. Thanks.>>Thank you.
One of the glories of the musical theater is, of course, live music.
But so often today on shows, either you can’t even see that there’s an orchestra
pit, or sometimes the band is actually in a different room altogether, sometimes
even seven flights up within the theater. And that’s done for all sorts of reasons
about controlling the sound and microphones, and blending with actors,
and of course so many new electronic instruments that are being used in the
orchestra pit. And because of this, although we love
their work, we so often don’t see inside the orchestra pit, so today I thought I’d
introduce you to Dave Weiss, who has been in The Lion King band since we began to
show 14 years ago now.>>Correct.>>Now let’s first talk about just life inside the orchestra pit.
wouldn’t, when did you start playing, an instrument?>>Well, I started very young.
I started on violin when I was five years old.
Both my folks are professional musicians and I, I switched to woodwinds, a couple
of years later because I just liked the flute better.
And that was my instrument, and then shortly after that, saxophone and
clarinet.>>And how’d you get into Broadway?>>Well, over the years after, after I got out of music school when I was in, I was
in New York. It was a place where I knew I could work
and I, enjoyed the work because I played both classical and jazz style, and it
just fit what I did better than playing in an orchestra.
And I started working for the show Barnum in 1982, right when I, after I started to
do conservative.>>And how many Broadway shows have you done, roughly?>>I’ve done about 50 Broadway and
off-Broadway shows.>>That’s extraordinary.>>Yes[LAUGH].>>So now on a typical night, when you’re actually in the pit playing, what time do
you arrive?>>I get to the theater probably about an hour before.>>An hour before.
People always imagine the orchestra arrives about 10 minutes to curtain.>>Yeah.
It depends on the individual too, but I have all these instruments I have to play
for Lion King so it’s, it’s an hour before maybe more like 45 minutes.
I have to make sure everything is working and ready to go and.>>Well, now that gets me to why I think
what you do is so interesting. Because when people think about the
orchestra, they think somebody’s down there playing an instrument, or maybe two
or three instruments.>>Mm-hmm.>>But you play, what, 12 different instruments?>>I’m playing 12 instruments for Lion King,
yeah, yes.>>And, and they’re all around you, on the floor?
Where are they?>>No, I have specially made stands to the left and the right of me.
And I have to leave an area so the conductor can come up through that.
That’s for the, this big guy here, so.>>And, and, since you’ve been with us in the beginning, how many flutes did you
have with you when we started the show?>>When we started in workshop, I brought close to 50 or 60 different instruments.>>You can play 60 different kinds of
flutes?>>I own easily that much, probably more.>>Wow.>>It’s an affliction, I think. [LAUGH]>>Yeah, I think it’s a curious thing.
Okay, so let’s talk about the flute in general.
Since where, because you’re down there in the pit.
You’ve got all these instruments. Now, what you’re holding is actually what
people think of as a traditional flute.>>Right. This is a Western designed flute.
It’s a particularly expensive one. It’s a gold flute.
And but it’s almost identical in design to what kids are playing in high school
bands and marching bands.>>And give us a sense of what this classic sound of a.>>Sure.>>The flute is.
[MUSIC] How adorable is that? That’s fantastic.
[LAUGH] Now with, so that’s the classic flute sound.>>Right.>>Now this, you also play the piccolo in
the show?>>Sure, yeah. It’s actually quite a lot of piccolo in
the, in the show.>>Lion King doesn’t seem like a piccolo show to me.
I’m thinking of John Philip Sousa with the piccolo.>>Well, well, when you think of the
stampede and all in.>>So how does the piccolo sound then? [MUSIC]>>Do you get a sore lip by the end of the
show?>>Never, no, no.>>No? Are there repetitive motion problems with
playing flute?>>in the hands, yes, especially with larger instruments, like something like this
that can give you a lot of problems.>>Okay, big one. So now I am curious because I suppose
most people would probably, of all your flutes, most recognize this.
So can you tell us about this?>>Right. Well now this is a pan pipe, oh, I’m
sorry, or a pan flute. this is a European design actually, a lot
of people.>>Why do I think those are Latin American?>>Well, you probably see guys on the street, as a matter of fact right in
Times Square right where we work, there’s always some sort of.>>Oh those guys are good.>>Right, they’re excellent, they’re
excellent. Now, those are generally from Peru or
Ecuador, and they play a different style of pan pipe.
But this is the European style. You’ll notice that it’s curved and it’s
one row. The South American style actually has two
rows and it goes back and forth. But you find pan pipes all over the
world, in China, in Africa, again this is Eastern European.>>So how does this sound? [MUSIC]>>Now in Lion King when do we first the,
the>>You hear this right in the beginning this instrument is strongly associated with
Simba, but not Simba all the way through, Simba, the younger Simba.
That we have in the first act, and half way through the second act.
So right in Circle of Life, right, in the, in the first number of the show.>>In all, when everyone’s on stage.>>Right.
So you hear this melody. [MUSIC]>>That’s fantastic.
This, that actual motif, which was first created by Hans Zimmer for the movie.>>Right, mm-hmm.>>And then was incorporated into our show.
And of course, Mark Manchino and Hans and Lebo and all these guys who did, but then
you’re also working with orchestrators, who are figuring out which flute to play
right?>>Right, yeah, when we first started the show the, the musical, I started working
on it a good year and a half before we opened.
And the only thing they knew at that point was we want pan pipes, because
that’s the sound of Simba, that’s, that’s what they hear, and that’s what was in
the movie. After that it was a blank slate.
If we were going to try and.>>Well, so what are these?>>Well, these are.>>Cause they’re pretty painted up and glamorous.>>Right, right.
These are various bamboo flutes from many different parts of the world.
We have China, this is from actually an American make.>>And do they really sound different?>>Oh, yes, they do.
This one, for example. Now this is actually on American-made
bamboo flute, but it’s very similar in design to flutes I’ve seen from Africa
and India. This is an Indian flute.
So, but, well, talk, talk, talk, I can show you what it sounds like.
[MUSIC]>>And that’s a melody that’s follows Mufasa.>>And now tell me, is this tunable?
Because, what do, what do you do about keys and things?>>Well, well that’s why I have to have so
many. The design of the flute, I mean if you
go, a flute like this, which is, you know, a contemporary make flute, actually
you could say is a renaissance flute. It’s not only an Indian flute, a Chinese
flute. when, during the Renaissance and Medieval
times, but then over the years in the west, it slowly developed into an
instrument like this, with all this key work on it.
And what the key work does is, to make it as simple as possible, if you’ll envision
the piano with the white keys and the black keys, well, all that key work
allows you to play the white keys and the black keys.>>So could anybody who plays a traditional
flute play one of these?>>Well, you could, you’re halfway in, but these do work a bit differently.>>Well, okay, I want to hear this and then
I want to talk about that. So this big honker here.>>Okay, right.>>What is that?>>Well, this is from South America.
It’s called toyos. It’s a bass pan pipe, it’s the large.>>Version of that.>>Version of this, but I’ve seen pictures
of Pygmies in central Africa on a.>>That’s taller than a Pygmy.>>On a tree stump, well he gets on a tree stump and he plays it like this.
But we use this twice in the show. Actually, well for two different sounds.
First in Circle of Life, where we’re using this sound.
[SOUND] And then later on, or shortly thereafter.>>huh.>>We used a lower end and it really colors
the evil Scar character.>>Oh yeah, yeah. What’s that sound like?>>[SOUND] And that follows him around quite
a bit.>>Now, I think what everyone would be wondering right now, we started, we
talked about you in the pit. How many people, because you can’t be
there every night.>>No.>>So how many people are there who actually could play 12 flutes?
How many people do you have?>>Well right now I have five people that have learned how to play it, and I teach
them how to do it.>>So you’re responsible for teaching them.>>Yeah.>>And do you schedule them, if you want a night off?>>Yes, exactly.
I mean, I can’t, I don’t feel it’s right to call somebody, say, at six or seven
o’clock and say, go in and cover me. Because it’s an awful lot to play.
You have to be ready to go, and if you haven’t played it in a few weeks or a few
months, you know, it’s just not fair.>>You have to practice up.>>Yeah, generally I have, have it scheduled out a few days in advance as to, when
someone should come.>>And is it some traditional, you know? So many people watching, play an
instrument. And we know what music looks like, but
it, the music is written out, but does it, do you have to indicate then in the
music which one of these flutes to play?>>Oh, sure. You have to pick up the exact right
instrument, otherwise the complete wrong notes are going to come out.
It’s going to sound horrible, so. [LAUGH]>>Yeah, it could be a disaster.>>Yeah.
[LAUGH]>>And I would suspect that some of the sounds you’ve made with this one, people
think are electronic. Are there any electronic flutes in The
Lion King?>>No, none at all.>>Everything, when we go to the show, everything we’re hearing is you?>>Yeah.
Is all these instruments, yeah.>>That’s fantastic.>>There’s actually a few more that I play in this show, but they wouldn’t fit on
the table. [LAUGH]>>They wouldn’t fit?
Are they too big?>>They, there’s just more, more pipes.>>More of this kind of thing?>>Yeah, yeah.>>Well, David, this is extraordinary. I think, when we think of the orchestra,
we think of traditional instruments.>>And we think of our high school band, and of course that’s where people can start,
but in this case I, I don’t know anybody who plays more stuff in, in one show and
has to manage then, if you will, the flute department within the orchestra.>>Right.>>So thanks for doing this.
So that’s a look inside, if you will, the orchestra pit, and some of the
complexities that the musicians there find.
Thanks.>>Thank you, Tom. [SOUND]>>So, you know, we’ve done this whole show
with each of you in your segments, but that’s in a sense not at all the world
you live in, because you’re part of a, a community backstage.
So I’d like to just talk about that for a second.>>Ilya, backstage, who do you deal with
most?>>Most of the time when I’m backstage during the show, I’m paying attention to
the puppets that are currently being used, or puppets that are in the wings
ready to go on. So top of the show, I’m usually paying
attention to Scar, because he’s the first big puppet mechanic that’s being used for
that reveal.>>And what department do you have to relate to most?
Are you pretty isolated in your.>>most of the time we work hand-in-hand with the wardrobe department, because the
costumes and the puppets are so integrated to other another with the, in
the Lion King. So wardrobe is the main, main pairing
that we have, but we also work closely with hair and makeup, because the hair
and makeup, depending on how we mount.>>It integrates right in.>>Yeah, depending on how we make the head mount and on how we mount certain pieces,
we need to have, the the area for makeup for instance to to do their job, and for
met, hair to put on the wigs and such, so we work a lot with John, Jordan, and
Elizabeth.>>And Elizabeth, so Elizabeth you have to mess with puppets, who else do you have
to encounter?>>Hair, hair mostly, really>>So Gary’s department is the one you, not on your show.>>Right, right.>>The one where Gary runs is where you.>>And we have people who come up into the
makeup room at the hour call. We have the, the young boy comes up and
he gets started because he has body paint, so we paint him a little bit, and
we mostly paint a part of the face that would be very difficult to paint after
hair is put on. And then he goes over and gets his hair
on and then finishes his makeup afterward.>>And you send him to someone else.>>Same happens with adult Nala.>>And, Gary, who do you mess with most?>>Mostly with Carly.
Carly and I together, we’re partners in crime.>>because your in, in this sense, you’re a
team, cause you’re actually on the same show.
So Carly gets Mary dressed, and you get Mary prepared with her hair.>>I do from here up, and she does from here
down.>>And do you ever trade off each others stuff?
Like, I mean, haves you ever had to do any wardrobe stuff?
Have you ever messed with her hair?>>I mean if there’s we, we look out for each other.
So if there’s something I would say, Carly, or I would help her.
And she would like, oh no, Gary you need the hat, or we definitely help each
other, yes. We look out for each other.>>And the hat’s a big part of that too.
Because there are times where Gary is responsible for checking the hat.
And then other times where I’ll pick it up from somewhere and store it away, or
something like that. So it’s kind of a trade off there.>>Presumably, with over 100 people back
stage at a musical, there have to be people you don’t get along with.
[LAUGH] Does that create tension backstage?
Well there’s a whole dynamic to the back stage choreography, really.>>Mm-hmm.>>So you’re running into everyone.
But depending on where you are and and what your your role is, you know, we kind
of have brief encounters with everybody.>>We’re isolated from everybody.>>No, yeah, so we’re flying through. Now, I want to talk about that isolation,
because Dave, you probably feel very isolated from the show in a sense.>>That, that’s true, yeah, we’re.>>You’re in the orchestra pit.
Can you see the action from where you.>>I see almost all none of it and I’m right next to the conductor too, but just we’re
so deep in the pit, I can see a little bit of the opening number and that’s
about it.>>So are you wondering what’s going on?>>No, I’ve seen, I’ve seen the show probably 15, 20 times over the years,
especially when we were first making it. And I saw it quite a bit then.>>And can you tell when something has gone
wrong?>>Oh you can hear it in a second, yeah. I can’t really see if something’s going
wrong, but if the conductor is on the phone and he’s conducting like this.
And it’s all sorts of mishegoss going on, then I know, you know, something’s gone
wrong.>>And I’m curious for all of you, do you now the audience of course, wants to see
a perfectly finished show, although they often talk about a show that, it’s not a
movie, it’s going to be different and live every night.
Do you all sort of relish little things going awry just to change up the day?>>[LAUGH] Sometimes big things go awry.
For instance, there was a time in The Lion King many, many years ago when in
the middle of the, He Lives in You number which is Simba and Rafiki.
and he throws the stick. They have the interchange in between.
And it hit her in the face. And she went down.>>And it’s in the middle of the song, and
we had to.>>And this was Sheila Gibbs, when she.>>That’s right.>>was playing Broadway, and she was playing.>>Sheila Gibbs and Chris Jackson.>>Rafiki, and she actually got knocked out
by, by Christopher Jackson.>>Right, right. And we had to make up her cover in 6
minutes.>>So the show stopped.>>So the show stopped, Show stopped, they brought the curtain in.>>They make up the cover, but we took that
makeup that we did earlier today which is a 30-minute makeup, we took 6 minutes to
get her in makeup mic and costume, 6 minutes to stage.>>And got the actress on stage.>>Which we were 5 stories up in, in those
days too, so we all had to run downstairs as well, right, right.>>And you’ve had puppets come apart in your
hands.>>yeah, I think probably one of the most nerve wracking once is when Pumbaa’s
spine snaps. And, basically what happens is Pumba is
like a back pack with two spines that hold out his rear legs, and during the
show, the lower spine snapped, so the entire puppet dropped to the ground, and
we had to.>>That’s not actually desirable is it?>>No, and we actually ended up having to, with zip ties, duct tape, and casting
material.>>To keep the show going.>>We wrapped it and got it, got it through the end of the show, and then since now,
we have actual pieces that we fabricated, so that in case they snap, we can put
these custom pieces into re-, you know, fortify that joint.>>You know when I introduced this, I talked
about you as an army, and I think most people don’t realized the extraordinary
coordination, the knowledge of your own area, and coordination that goes back
stage. So, thank you for joining us today.
this has been for me I’ve even, I’ve learned a lot of stuff about you, so
we’ve babbled on long enough. It’s time to wrap up.
So thank you for joining us. These programs are brought to you from
the graduate center of the City University of New York, in partnership
with our friends at CUNY TV. On behalf of the American Theatre Wing,
I’m Tom Schumacher, and thanks for joining us for another edition of Working
in the Theater. [SOUND] I’m Ted Chapin, Chairman of the
American Theatre Wing. The Wing has played a vital role in New
York’s theatrical life for more than 60 years, best known for creating the TONY
Awards, who stand for excellence, but we also support education in the theater,
and our work reaches beyond Broadway in New York.
The Working in the Theater television programs, which are supported by the
Annenberg Foundation and Dorothy Straussen Foundation, are unequaled
forums for discussions with today’s most creative artists.
Downstage Center’s in-depth radio interviews were created in conjunction
with XM Satellite Radio, and can be heard on our website.
For people who are starting their careers, we have a 2 week boot camp for
aspiring actors from colleges across the country called SpringboardNYC.
And our Theatre Intern Group provides a forum for young people who are starting
their careers to build a professional network.
All of the American Theatre Wing’s educational and media programs are
available for free, on demand, from our website, AmericanTheatreWing.org.
Thanks for your interest in the wing and thanks for watching[MUSIC].

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