Closed Captions and Movie Theaters – Jessica Flores

Closed Captions and Movie Theaters – Jessica Flores


Closed captions in movie theaters… This is going to be a pretty lengthy topic
but, I’ll make it into two videos. So, let’s get started. A lot of hearing people ask me, how do I watch
movies when going to the movie theater. so I thought I’d make a video for those who
are curious. And those who have not asked me yet. Most movie theaters nowadays… Not all of them… but most of them nowadays carry closed caption
devices. The closed caption devices or the ones that
I have used so far are the closed captioning stands and the closed captioning glasses. The closed caption glasses are a wide pair
of tinted glasses that display the subtitles and it’s attached to these wires that are attached to a box that you wear around your neck. Even though this sounds like a good idea, I have only used this device twice. And there are few reasons why. Number one. I get tangled up in all the wires that I need to wear around my neck when I’m trying to put them on. (Choking) Number two. I wear glasses. I mean I have my contacts in now, but I wear
glasses. See… look at my glasses. And those of you that have glasses know how
uncomfortable it is to have glasses on top of glasses on top of glasses on top of glasses on top of glasses. So if I run out of contacts… yeah. Closed caption stands. The device is a LED light screen that displays
the closed captions. And it’s attached to this long flexible pole. that you can insert into your cup holder. And adjust the screen wherever you want to
see the closed captions. I use this device often. However, there are a couple of downsides to it. One of them being the closed captions don’t
show up right away on the device. So I spend a lot of time before the movie worrying if the captions are going to show
up or not. There has been a lot of times where I’ve had
to get up during the movie, when it just started or in the middle of the movie and go find somebody who could fix the captions
for me. Some places forget to charge the device. So the closed captions will turn off completely. Would you want the audio turning off during
the movie? Also the LED light screen can be a hassle
to adjust depending on where you’re seated. It’s easiest to adjust the screen when you’re
sitting in the middle row of the movie theater. But those seats are also, the most impossible
to get. So that means if I show up late and I’m seated
all the way in the front row, I’m gonna basically be holding my caption device something like right over my face and it’s
gonna be blocking the entire screen. I’ve done it before. It’s not cute. There are also some theaters that have open
captioned movies. Open captioned movies are basically captions that are displayed directly on the screen. Just like if you were going to watch a foreign film with subtitles. Open captioned theaters are the jackpot! However, I have only been to one of them when
I was younger. And I don’t remember what movie it was but I remember just thinking that it was some kind
of dream that I had. And I still think it’s a dream because I’m
never able to find any open captioned theaters available in San Francisco or the Bay Area. New movie theaters need to start providing
open captioned movies. But I’ll explain more about the importance
of them in the next video. Anyways, I hope you guys learned something
today. If you did, pass this video and share it so
another person can learn something today. In a couple of weeks, I’ll be talking about
open captioned movies theaters and the importance of them. So make sure to subscribe or add me or Instagram,
all that. And yeah. Have a great day! I’ll see you all later!

24 thoughts on “Closed Captions and Movie Theaters – Jessica Flores

  1. One of the most annoying things about theaters when they DO provide open captions is this: they often make them available only at showtimes that are the most inconvenient for the majority of people, then they have the nerve to say no one shows up! Example times are: weekday – 10:30 AM, 11:45 AM, 2:30 PM. And that's it. Nothing in the evenings or weekends.

  2. saw this a while back, from the UK https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2011/may/23/cinemas-deaf-people-subtitled-screenings

  3. Hi Jessica,
    I just subbed after a friend shared one of your lip reading videos on facebook. Your videos are great! Thanks for making them. I can't wait to see more from you.

  4. In my country, most of the movies are captioned by default, though they are captioned in Chinese

  5. Ok so… I'm not deaf or HoH, but for some reason, I actually use the CC on tv all the time, and I had NO IDEA that theaters had that option!! 😳😁

  6. Open captions (always only shown a couple of times a week, always at mid-day showings) were more common for a bit in the late 90's and early 00's but as the personal captioning devices have become more affordable as options for theaters, they have pretty much stopped offering open captions. My local theater had one movie a week, 2 or 3 times a week, open captioned movies until a couple of years ago when they "upgraded" to the glasses. I can choose from more movies/showings now but only if I'm willing to put up with the massive headache I get from wearing the heavy things and constantly shifting my eye focus back and forth between the big screen and the words that are a centimeter from my face. :/

  7. Open captions are mandated by the accessibility regulations in my country (Israel). Foreign films have subtitles anyway, so it's not unusual for patrons to see captions. Even children's movies which are dubbed, have to have captions now, for deaf children.

  8. There should definitely be showings available for the HoH, but every showing should NOT have captions. Yes, you should be able to watch the movies the way you want, but so should I. Captions are distracting, and take away from the show. I don’t even like having captions on anime. Saying that every showing should have captions, and hearing people should stuff it is pretty stupid. That’s like saying you should stuff it because the devices are uncomfortable.

  9. I’m hard of hearing and I’ve used CC glasses many times and the CC stand up device a couple times. I’d prefer the glasses because I can see the movie better but the problem is that it sometimes doesn’t work and having to worry about the battery. I think the stand up device has a better battery.

  10. i know this vid was made a couple years ago, but i find it frustrating that the bay area isnt the forefront of theater CC technology. hopefully it's gotten a little better by now. Seems like there could be some sort of app made for this?

  11. I’m deaf but I wear a CI and I’m having very difficult understanding when I watch movies like marvel and horrors. All I want for my life is CC in the screen for me to watch and read. I had the device thing but I hated it because it was blocking the screen.

  12. I like your speech! You pronounce your words clearly like a BBC newsreader! Good for viewers not familiar with your accent! Which is more than I can say for many YouTube narrators! They rush through their speech, and, especially with their thick accent, you have to replay the video to fully catch what they are saying!

  13. What is your opinion about Brazil demanding all cinema theaters and all movies to provide sign language transcription and sign language devices to deaf users? (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jp_OqGNj70A)

  14. Over the years I've become more ma d more dependent on subtitles just so I don't have to rewind if I don't understand what word the actor just said or someone distracts me while I'm watching at home.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *