Lindsey Stirling: Brave Enough

Lindsey Stirling: Brave Enough


– Dance.
– Man: Dance, come on. ( music playing ) Lindsey! Lindsey! Lindsey. Audience chanting:
Lindsey! Lindsey! Lindsey! Lindsey:
Looking back over my life, I can’t believe everything
that has happened to me. I’m a very different person
than I was, and it’s not because
I woke up one morning and it changed. I know what it feels like
to be afraid. I know what it feels like
to not believe in myself. I know what it feels like
to look in the mirror and hate everything
you see. I’ve fallen multiple times
as I’ve been on this journey. Moments like this,
I just try to stop feeling because I’m too scared. All my trials really
helped me prepare myself to become more brave. Every time you get up
a little bit stronger. This is who I am
right now. ( cheering ) – Girl: We love you!
– Man: Yeah! ( music playing ) ♪ Don’t let this feeling ♪ Don’t let
this feeling fade ♪ ♪ Turn it up
let me hear you live ♪ ♪ Don’t let this feeling ♪ Don’t let
this feeling fade ♪ ♪ One life, one love ♪ Don’t let this feeling ♪ Don’t let
this feeling fade ♪ ♪ Turn it up
let me hear you live ♪ ♪ Don’t let this feeling ♪ Don’t let
this feeling fade ♪ ♪ One life, one love. ( clapping ) You got a slow clap. Erich, put your hands
in the air. – Look excited.
– Whoo. Yeah, thank you, Chad.
Yeah. Whoo. ( violin playing ) ♪ Some ♪ Somebody shine a light Okay. Okay. ♪ Somebody make me
feel alive ♪ ♪ And shatter me Can you put some reverb
and a tiny bit of delay on it? ♪ Make Just cover it up
a little bit, you know? I’m not a singer. The very first day of the tour
will be on my 30th birthday. ( music playing ) Whoo. Turning 30 does
make you evaluate where you’ve been
in your life. My career has taken me in
so many unexpected directions. Like, how can, you know,
this crazy dancing violin thing that no one’s gonna like,
how does that happen? Yay. The thought of turning 30
has mostly made me think about who I want to be
in the future. ( music playing ) ( violin playing ) ( laughter ) Lindsey is the most
hands-on artist you’ll ever see. ( muttering ) – From the live show…
– Walk it back. – The choreography…
– Bum, bum, turn. – The videos…
– Might just cheat it
a little bit. I was a little behind. Du, du, du, ba, da, da, one. – Lindsey does do it all.
– Are you ready to go? Let’s do it. ( music playing ) Ha ha!
Yeah, I think this is good if, during their thing if it just
kind of sleeky– – If it’s dark, yeah.
– Sleekly come out. Yeah, they can definitely get up
there and do their thing. There’s so much going on
in this new tour. White is not matching at all. She’s the creative everything
behind it, too. So there’s just stress there
to begin with. Ahh! I’m gonna–
( groans ) White doesn’t glow every well
under blacklight. It has to have
some pigment to it. ( music playing ) It’s good enough.
Look, I fixed my costume. – Yeah. Is that gaffe tape?
– Did you see it before? How’d you do that?
Is it really? Just stand back, Bertie, please.
It’ll look great. ( violin playing ) The whole concept
of this Brave Enough tour is about the courage to feel,
to feel everything. ( violin playing ) You know, I wrote the album
very much inspired by the passing of, you know,
my best friend and that extreme loss
and learning to reopen again. ( music playing ) You know, we can’t block
ourselves from emotions. If you numb the bad,
then you’ll numb the good. Who’s here for me?
Oh, Drew’s here for me. Drew:
We’ve all had moments
where we’ve worried about her, especially on this tour
with the stress and this heartache
and this loss. But she’s still, like,
that spritely, like, “Hey, guys, what’s going on?
How you doing?” Look at the back.
I just made it so pretty. Look at you. You should,
you know, be a costumer. You know what? In my next life,
that’s what I’m gonna do. ( indistinct chatter ) Today is the first show. My mom talked to me
yesterday, and she was devastated
that she couldn’t be here today. She’s been at almost
every first show. They can’t leave Arizona
because of my dad’s health. All right, let’s do this. ( cheers and applause ) Life got a lot harder
this year. And I am so nervous
to go up there and play these songs
that stir up grief. I hope I can
get through them. ( violin playing ) The show starts with a song
called “The Phoenix,” using the phoenix,
the mythical bird, as a symbol of rising
from the ashes, going through cycles
of being at the top and then falling down. Life is about picking yourself
up over and over again. and that basically is the story
of my entire life. ( music playing ) ( cheers and applause) ( music playing ) I’m Diane Stirling, and I’m
Lindsey Stirling’s mother. I’ve been at her first show in the last two tours, and I really wanted
to be here for this one. ( audience cheers ) I was so surprised, and, um,
made me start to cry. My mom means so much to me, and she’s always
taking care of me. Oh, this is one
of your green juices. Thanks, yeah.
That Mom makes. This is what you made
Dad drink all the time. It is, yeah. I want her to know that even
though there’s tough things going on in our lives
and our family that, um, she still matters. Oh, I’m so glad
you were surprised. These milestones are important
to her entire family, and her father would be here
if he could. He can’t. Diane:
But her father has cancer and is going through
the battle of his life. Lindsey:
Oh, look at that smile.
That’s the smile I love. A little less than a year ago, my dad was diagnosed
with cancer. He’s been going through
chemo treatment. My dad has played
a huge role in little bits and pieces
of all the details that make up who I am. His signature
is in everything I do. How you doing, Papa? Pop’s fine. You know, he wouldn’t just say,
“You can do this” and then send me on my way. He’d say, “You can do this, and I’m gonna do
everything I can to help you.” Father:
Keep at it, Linds. Come on.
You can do this. Thing is, he didn’t
just do this with me. He did this with his students. He taught religious studies
to teenagers. He had thousands of students that he taught
through the years. Everybody else got chocolate,
I got pumpkin seeds. They’re incredibly nutritious. And delicious. Right, Dad? Mm. I’ll say so.
Nutritious. My parents, they’re just– I wouldn’t be here
today where I’m at if they hadn’t
just helped me along every step of the way. – One more surprise…
– ♪ Happy birthday to you… Mostly, I’m proud
of the person that she is, how she has
stuck to her values and stayed true
to who she is. Thank you, guys. She’s just a bundle of light. Ever since she was
a little tiny thing, just a bundle of light. I was six years old
when I first picked up my first violin. My parents,
they loved classical music. (classical music playing) That was the majority
of what I was exposed to in terms of music as a kid. That’s kind of what I thought
it was to be a star. I would see the violinists and that they always
got the solos. You know, they seemed to be
the rock star of the orchestra, so in my mind
as a six-year-old, I was like,
“I gotta get my hands on one of those
wooden things. That’s how I become a star.” I begged my parents
for two things: violin lessons,
and I begged for dance lessons. They were able to scrape up
enough money for one. I’ve always loved dance,
but I chose the violin. I was in a pageant-style
competition. It was called Junior Miss. And there was a lot of
violinists in this competition, and I remember thinking, “If I do something
really different…” It was the first time
I ever danced while playing the violin. That was the moment
I fell in love with performing. ( cheers and applause ) It was unlike any reaction I’d ever had
from an audience. I’d had, like, approval, and I’d impressed
people before, but I had never felt
like I had entertained until that moment, and it
was this addictive feeling. I thought,
“I have to figure out how to make this my life.” Musically, I was starting
to write music. I was starting
to dabble in it. I was realizing that, you know,
I wanted to do music, but didn’t
have any idea how. I was in college
trying to discover what I want to do
with my life. Classes were overwhelming. I felt like my life
was out of control. I just started
to cling to food and become obsessive
about it. It’s all I thought about. I remember going to parties, and all you see
is the food tray. And then you’re like, “Who’s
the skinniest girl in the room? Is it me?” You know, I’d go on dates, but all I could
think about was panicking when I realized they
were taking me to a pizza spot and, like, thinking, “How can I
avoid eating the pizza?” Feeling like I could
control my weight seemed very empowering to me. Even though you think this is
giving you a sense of control, there starts to be
this inner dialogue that is actually
controlling you, telling you
that you’re worthless. I didn’t really care
about my passion. I wasn’t playing
the violin anymore. My mom kept saying, “I think we
need to figure something out. I think something’s wrong.” And one day, finally,
it clicked, and I realized,
“I think I’m anorexic.” “Shatter Me” used the ballerina
in a music box to be a metaphor
for me being, you know, stuck in an eating disorder and feeling like
I couldn’t break free. ♪ Somebody shine a light ♪ I’m frozen
by the fear in me ♪ ♪ Somebody make me
feel all right ♪ ♪ And shatter me ( cheers and applause ) ♪ If only the clockwork
could speak ♪ ♪ I wouldn’t be so alone ♪ We’d burn every magnet
and spring ♪ ♪ And spiral
into the unknown ♪ ♪ Somebody shine a light ♪ I’m frozen
by the fear in me ♪ ♪ Somebody make me feel alive ♪ And shatter me ♪ So cut me from the line ♪ Dizzy spinning endlessly ♪ Somebody
make me feel alive ♪ ♪ And shatter me ♪ Shatter me ♪ If I break the glass
then I’ll have to fly ♪ ♪ There’s no one to catch me ♪ If I take a dive ♪ I’m scared of change and
the days stay the same ♪ ♪ The world is spinning
but only in vain ♪ ♪ If I break the glass
then I’ll have to fly ♪ ♪ There’s no one to catch me
if I take a dive ♪ ♪ I’m scared of change
and the days stay the same ♪ ♪ The world is spinning
but only in vain ♪ It was one thing
to change my eating habits, but it was a completely
different process to try to change
my automatic thoughts. Like, these voices in my head
that would look in the mirror and say, “You’re ugly.” I would stop and I would
say out loud, like, “You’re beautiful.” ♪ Somebody shine a light ♪ I’m frozen
by the fear in me ♪ ♪ Somebody make me
feel alive ♪ ♪ And shatter me ♪ So cut me from the line ♪ Dizzy spinning endlessly ♪ Somebody make me feel alive ♪ And shatter me ♪ Shatter me ♪ Somebody make me
feel alive ♪ ♪ And shatter me In the road of recovery, I went on a search
to find myself. Then I started
to write music again, and, uh,
I would never go back. How you doing? Good to see you too. They sensed the energy. Okay, let’s do this. Good morning. We’re backstage
at the Dolby theater. Doughnuts. We’ve done the show
over 30 times on this tour, but the Dolby theater, it’s one of the biggest
shows of my career, and how lucky am I
that I get to be here? Whoo! Do you know if, uh,
the dancers are awake? – Uh-huh.
– Yeah? They’re in their room there. – Oh, really?
– At least a couple of them. Must be a special day. Being here
at the Dolby theater, it’s, you know,
the biggest show of the tour. I mean, this is where
they hold the Academy Awards. Wow, I haven’t
come out here yet. This is so–
wow, this is so beautiful. Holy cow. Drew:
Looking up
at those empty seats and just being like, “These are
all going to be full of ravenous, crazy fans, it literally
gives me goose bumps and just makes me giddy
with excitement. Little spaceships
all, like, you know, like Star Wars pods. “Emperor!
We have a request.” It’s the LA show. The LA show always
brings extra pressure because all the industry
folks come out. This is your chance
to be like, “I deserve to be on this stage,”
you know. Impress everyone. – Are you ready in five?
– Uh, sorry. I’m just admiring my glory. Just, uh, running late. Oh, sorry. I’m sorry. It’s all good. – Bye!
– Bye. LA just makes you nervous,
you know, ’cause, like,
all your friends are coming. Yeah, up in–
I kept having nightmares for the last, like, week. There was a tornado
coming in one, and I was stuck in this car
that wouldn’t drive. Like,
that kind of nightmare. Wake up in a panic? And I wake up in, like,
a panic. I’m nervous,
but I’m excited. It’s crazy to be playing
at such an amazing, historic venue, especially
when you think about how, you know, my career
really started. After college,
I had found my passion again and I wasn’t about
to give it up. I was starting to dabble in this new style of playing
the violin and dancing. I was doing covers. I joined a country band, and it was the first time
I was hired as a professional musician. I actually bought a book
that was “How to Make It
in the Music Industry,” and it became something
that I was obsessed with. The more I tried, the more it
started to sound impossible, because agents and management
and record labels all just kept saying to me, “It’s really interesting, but, you know, you just
don’t fit in the box.” I just kept knocking on door
after door after door, and they just kept closing
in my face. And then finally
I had my moment. The energy in here tonight
is on fire. And here are three words you don’t often hear
in the same sentence. Hip-hop violinist. But that’s exactly
what our next act is. She’s Lindsey Stirling. I felt so inspired
to go on that show. They tell you that
this is your make or break. Like, this is your moment
for you to have your shot. – I’m gonna say yes.
– You’re going to Hollywood. Lindsey:
When I made it
to the quarterfinals, like, in my mind, that meant
that I was probably gonna win. Good seeing you. Piers Morgan:
One problem. The violin. You end up missing
loads of notes, and there were times
when it sounded to me like a bunch of rats
being strangled. Seriously. That bad. ( audience boos ) Lindsey:
At that moment, I thought
what they said was God’s word. Like,
“I don’t have what it takes. You’re right.
I did sound terrible.” I ran backstage,
and I just found the only place I could be alone,
which was the bathroom. You know, that’s the only place
the cameras wouldn’t find me, and I just sat on the floor
and I sobbed for hours until the cleaning staff
came in, and they were like, “Oh,
we didn’t know anybody
was still here.” Like, “Hon, we’re closed up
for the night.” Like, “You gotta go home.” I don’t think
what you’re doing right now is enough to fill
a theater in Vegas. ( cheers and applause ) I remember feeling that night that I had blown the biggest
moment of my life. Thank you so much, LA! But I’ve come,
since that moment, to realize that life is kind, and it will give you
another opportunity. ( cheers and applause ) Lindsey:
After “America’s Got Talent,”
it hurt so bad, but something inside me
wasn’t ready to give up yet, and so I started to write, and I started experimenting
with dubstep music. There was not
a lot of EDM producers living in Provo, Utah, but I found one guy… This is Mark OG, everybody. – How you doing?
– Yeah. He is the best,
and he makes me look super–
and sound super good. ( imitating music ) I would have to,
you know, pay him before I even started
to create a track with him, because I had this idea of being a dancing,
electronic violinist. No one’s gonna
take a risk on that, so I– you know, every time
I could earn enough money, I would create a new track. Basically, all my savings
went into this project that I didn’t even know
if I could do. Lindsey:
We wrote three songs,
they’d been sitting on iTunes. My mom bought them
and my grandma bought them, and that’s about it. Suddenly, I put up
this one video on YouTube, and they started to sell. I saw the iTunes spike. ( plucks string ) I finished my first album
when I was 26. And I was on my first tour,
like, a week later. Everybody wanna introduce
yourself to the camera? I’m Drew, the drummer. Gavi, the piano guy. Lindsey:
Can’t see Gavi
the piano guy. – Piano guy.
– Lindsey: Yay. – Wow, that is amazing.
– This is ’cause this guy. Lindsey:
I met Gavi and Drew two days before my very first
ever ticketed show. Just kinda got them
word of mouth, you know. I’d never met them before, and here we are rehearsing
for my first ever show. On that first tour, we were
doing these tiny, little venues that were, like, 200 people, and I was, like,
living the dream. I was like, “I can’t believe
I’m a rock star.” Like, “I love this.” And I was meeting fans
for the first time. Thanks so much
for coming out today. Ugh. Have you guys had fun
at the festival? – Yeah!
– Yeah? Drew:
As a band, our
relationship grew over time, and Lindsey and Gavi
got very, very close as far as, like–
they just became best friends. Gavi:
She’s being a good
team member right now. My band colors with me. Don’t pretend you’re not
enjoying this. Oh, this is awesome. Man: You’re showing
your manlihood right now. Yeah, I’m flexing
while I do this, though, so it’s all good. From the moment I met Gavi, he made me feel just at ease. Almost like an older brother. Gavi and I can never sleep past, like,
7:00 in the morning, so we hang out here
in the captain’s seat. But it’s nice being up here. We get first glance
at the scenery while everybody else
is still asleep. We would just talk about life and, you know,
and laugh together. I just took picture by
the Christmas tree out there. – Oh, my gosh.
– Christmas came early. ( laughter ) You know,
when you have people that you can sit there
and do nothing with and love every second of it… Wolf pack.
Animal pack. You know,
those are your best friends. Those are the people
that will be with you forever. ( cheers and applause ) For the first
18 months of touring, every single show sold out. For nearly
a year and a half. Then it was like,
“Oh, well, that 400-seater sold out really quickly. Let’s go up
to the 800-seater.” That one sold out again. “Okay, let’s go up
to the 1,200-seater.” We’re like, “This is real.” ( cheers and applause ) ( cheers and applause ) Man: Gavi? Gav– – What’s up?
– I was just gonna ask you
about this show. Your thoughts right now. This is fun. I’ve come to the conclusion
that you never take for granted the people that come
to see you play. I think it’s very cool
people are out here. We’re in the middle of Tokyo and people are out here
to see Lindsey play, so I’m excited. I’ve been begging
my booking agent to bring us
to Asia for a while, and now it’s just crazy
that here we are. I was making all these
little music videos. My fan base
grew exponentially, And Drew and Gavi and I set out to do basically
a full world tour. I’ve said
the wrong city twice. – Wow.
– I’m freezing. The crazy part.
Right there. You’re on an animal.
You’re on an animal. Lindsey:
Last year,
we were actually on tour, and, um, you know,
in the middle of tour we found out that Gavi had,
uh, lymphoma cancer. Gavi got sick very quickly. He went home immediately. Okay, so I’m gonna
send this to you. I think you guys
are about to go on right now. 9:30.
So I’m gonna be a part. Ready? This is why… Lindsey:
The doctors were very sure
that he would get better. He did get better.
He was cancer-free. He left the hospital. We had a welcome home
party for him. I didn’t think
that that welcome home party would be the last time
that I saw him. It was the most devastating
moment of my life, realizing that my best friend
was just gone. Before he got sick, Gavi and I
started writing a song together one day during sound check, and I kept promising him that we’re gonna finish
that song that we started. And it never
even occurred to me that he might not get better. It just wasn’t
a possibility in my mind. So this is Gavi’s song. ( applause ) After Gavi passed away,
I just kind of closed up. I was so almost numb
to everything. But one thing my dad
tells me all the time, he’s told me my whole life, is that you’re never alone
no matter how alone you feel. Our loved ones aren’t gone
after they pass away. Every time
I went in the studio, I wore something
that reminded me of him, and I would also pray
that Gavi would help me write. It’s been really hard. I remember just being
terrified to go on the road without Gavi. Being surrounded
by that environment that I knew him the best in, seeing, you know,
the keyboard setup, and just all these things stirred up so many memories
that were so close. Just– I couldn’t believe
they weren’t there– they weren’t happening anymore. And this goes down
further to the ground, right? Man:
Uh, actually, I’m not sure. I haven’t looked
at the framing of it yet. Still gotta be lower. It’s about a foot too high. Grief is a very strange thing. It comes at you
when you least expect it. It comes in waves. And it can be triggered
by something that you would
never even imagine. ( coughs ) So I’m really upset because, um, man… oh, I’m just so disappointed. I’ve planned
this whole show. Half of it is built
around this idea of this scrim, and I was told
it would look a certain way, and, um, it’s not working, and I’m just kinda
devastated about it. You know, man, if I was just a better violinist, if I could just play better, I wouldn’t have to plan
all these stupid tricks and… visuals and dancing
and costumes to cover up the fact
that I’m just mediocre. I’m at a loss. So disappointed, and also right now I’m just, you know, this is when…
you know, it’s moments like this
when Gavi would come find me and he would, you know,
he’d give me a big hug and he’d tell me that everything
was gonna be okay. He was always the first person
to come find me when I’d run off
and, you know, be worried, and now he’s not here. My whole album was written
about being brave enough– brave enough to feel. And sometimes I have–
this is a dark time, and at moments like this, I just stop– I almost
just try to stop feeling because I’m too scared. I got that one, though. Yeah, that little rat. Hi, Luna. Oh, gosh, I look terrible. ( music playing on computer ) Do you like this shot? ( laughs )
I don’t think I ever saw that. In so many ways,
Gavi’s a huge part of this tour, of this album. I know
he’s been there with me not only in the studio,
but he loved the stage, and I know
he’s there with me. Lindsey: This one’s
gonna make you cry. – Man: It already did.
– Really? Oh, my goodness.
Every time. Think we’re all
gonna be bawling every day. Lindsey:
I invited his mom
to the show, and I was like,
“There’s gonna be, like, a big tribute to Gavi in it.” Gavi’s mom is coming
to the show tonight, and it’s the first time
she’s been to a show since he passed away. And I actually haven’t seen
his mom since his service. I’m hoping
that I say the right things and that it comes out,
um, you know, comes out
in a very special way. At his service,
over and over again, people kept saying
that Gavi was so brave– he was so brave
with his heart, and that struck me,
and I thought, “That’s so true.” Gavi lived with his whole heart
and he was so brave in that way, something that I had never
been brave enough to be, and so my album
is called “Brave Enough.” This tour
is the “Brave Enough” tour and it’s all based
around this idea of what I was inspired
by Gavi to be, and it was to live life
in a brave enough way. ( music playing ) ♪ I remember,
I remember those days ♪ ♪ Laughing out loud,
staying up too late ♪ ♪ Staring out the window
as I see your face ♪ ♪ I remember, I remember
those days ♪ ♪ I remember those days ♪ We had a little bit of time,
but it’s never enough ♪ ♪ Remember driving all night ♪ We’d been
talking ’bout love ♪ ♪ Now that you’re gone
it sure is tough ♪ ♪ We had a little bit of time
but it’s never enough ♪ ♪ No, it’s never enough ♪ I remember,
I remember those days ♪ ♪ I remember,
I remember those days ♪ ♪ Yeah ♪ I remember,
I remember those days ♪ ♪ I remember those days ♪ I remember,
I remember those eyes ♪ ♪ They saw my heart
without any disguise, yeah ♪ ♪ And in your arms
there’s nothing to hide ♪ ♪ I remember,
I remember those eyes ♪ ♪ I remember those eyes ♪ I remember,
I remember those days ♪ ♪ I remember, I remember
those days ♪ ♪ Yeah ♪ I remember,
I remember those days ♪ ♪ I remember those days ♪ I remember,
I remember those days ♪ ♪ I remember, I remember
those days ♪ ♪ I remember,
I remember those days, yeah ♪ ♪ I remember those days ♪ I remember,
I remember those days ♪ Love you. Love you guys. ♪ I remember those days ( applause ) – Oh.
– I know. I’m gray now. You look beautiful. Such a beautiful, beautiful tribute to him. I was crying, so I missed… You know, we have in spirit
brought Gavi around the world with us
the last few months. He’s still a part
of what we do, and he’ll always be a part
of this show. That makes me feel so good to know that he’s still
appearing in people’s lives,
you know. Oh, 100%. Just hearing her talk
about Jason and what, you know, he meant
to her was wonderful, and he was always
goofy and silly, and I think he found
a kindred soul in Lindsey, ’cause I think
she’s like that too, so they had a wonderful
time together. I hope that you… felt his spirit there. Being vulnerable and living
with your whole heart is a lifelong pursuit. It’s not something
you learn in a year. I’ve been sharing this story
of being brave enough, you know, now every night
for 40 shows. It took me about 20 shows
to not sob through that number. Like, I’m at a good place.
It’s been kinda therapeutic. You know, it felt like
I hoped it would feel to be able to see
what the show meant to her. Thank you for being here.
You’re amazing. And also it made me realize that it’s so important to me to continue
to share this message. Oh,
I just got a great idea. Yeah, it’s really cool. Um, I’m actually thinking– let me see.
Open this up. The show gets kinda heavy
at a certain point, where I talk about loss,
I talk about grief, talking about
how life goes on and, you know,
playing Gavi’s song, and so I wanted
to kind of come out of that into something
a little lighter, and so I decided
I would do some magic. Yeah, so come out with it, spin it around,
and also, like, you know, when you unveil
and I’m in there, um, you know,
you guys do that– ( gasps )
and then quickly open it. Magic makes things new.
It makes things exciting. It makes people feel
like a little kid again when they’re watching it. Woman: Perfect. You know, even though there’s
all this hard, heavy stuff that is in everyday life,
you know, there’s also magic. Woman: Come in. Hi.
I just wanted to say hey– – Oh!
– Hi. How you doing? What’s up?
I’m so good. How are you? Good to see you. Good.
Thanks for having us. ZZ and I wrote
“Hold My Heart” together, so she will be singing that and performing that
live with us. – How’s the tour going?
– It’s been so good. – Yeah?
– Been a super fun tour. Like, I love the show, and I think my favorite number
is “Hold My Heart.” – Really?
– Yeah, we do, like,
a whole magic thing. – Yes!
– People love that song. Six months ago, uh, went in
the studio with Lindsey. She really knew
what she wanted. You know, for her to want me
to bring my style and my artistry
to the collaboration is great. Can I watch the magic show
as it’s happening, though? Oh, like, what we’re doing? How it works? Yeah, what you guys
are doing is so cool. A magician
never reveals her tricks. I think it’s amazing when
someone can put their own story into their music
and into their whole show, and, uh, I think
the song is boss. I really love the song. ♪ I need a hero to save me ♪ I’m not a girl
to set free ♪ ♪ It’s nothing
you did to me ♪ ♪ I’ve always been this way ♪ I might be strong ♪ I might be weak ♪ There might be a part of me
that I won’t let you keep ♪ ♪ Been on this road ♪ And come this far ♪ Don’t need a man
to hold my hand ♪ ♪ I just want one
to hold my heart ♪ ♪ I just want one
to hold my ♪ ♪ Heart ♪ Hold my ♪ Heart ♪ Don’t be afraid
to hold this ♪ ♪ Even the thorns
have roses ♪ ♪ Ooh, ooh, ooh ♪ I know I can stand alone ♪ But I can’t love
on my own ♪ ♪ I might be strong ♪ I might be weak ♪ There might be a part of me
that I won’t let you keep ♪ ♪ Been on this road ♪ And come this far ♪ Don’t need a man
to hold my hand ♪ ♪ I just want one
to hold my heart ♪ ♪ I just want one
to hold my ♪ ♪ Heart ♪ Ooh ♪ Oh ♪ Oh ♪ Oh ♪ Want you to,
want you to hold my heart ♪ ♪ Want you to,
want you to hold my heart ♪ ♪ Want you to,
want you to hold my heart ♪ ♪ Want you to,
want you to hold my heart ♪ ♪ Want you to,
want you to hold my heart ♪ ♪ Want you to,
want you to hold my heart ♪ ♪ Want you to, want you to,
want you to, want you to ♪ ♪ Want you to,
want you to hold my heart ♪ ♪ I might be strong ♪ I might be weak ♪ There might be a part of me
that I won’t let you keep ♪ ♪ Been on this road ♪ And come this far ♪ Don’t need a man
to hold my hand ♪ ♪ I just want one
to hold my heart ♪ ♪ Ooh, ooh, ooh ♪ I just want one
to hold my ♪ ♪ Heart ♪ Ooh, I just want one
to hold my heart ♪ Drew:
The record’s extremely
personal for her. She’s learned how to
kind of reopen herself and reopen her heart into
actually finding happiness and not being shut off
from the world emotionally. Thank you so much.
How you guys doing? ( cheering ) What about the top balcony?
How are you doing up there? ( cheering ) Whew! Lindsey:
It means so much to me when you get this connection
with your audience and when you can see
that they felt it, they felt all the things
that I felt on stage. Hi, Luna!
Hey, nice suit, by the way. Okay, spin. Spin. My favorite comment
is when people say they laughed and they cried and they had fun. ( laughter ) Everyone, give it up
for Miss Luna! ( cheers and applause ) I wanted to make sure
that it was something that people walked away
from uplifted. That’s really important to me. I know that
every single one of you has talents,
you have passions, you have things that
you’re amazing at, things that
you want to share. But I also know
how terrifying and almost
crippling it can be, the thought of taking
something that you love and putting it out there
for other people to judge. People that succeed
fail a lot. They failed many, many times. But they know how to rise
every time they fall, and so that’s what
this next song is about. It’s about shutting
out the voice and having the courage
to step into the arena. ( cheering ) Whoo! Yeah! It was this massive show.
Dancers! – Oh, my God.
– Magic! Magic was the best part! Lindsey:
I’m so happy with
how it was received. As much stress
and as much fear
went into the show, it was all so worth it. – ( cheering )
– Oh, my God! Just a little bit nervous because some of my friends
were here tonight. It’s almost easier
to talk about these things in front of strangers
than it is to, like, really be raw and vulnerable in front of people
that you care about. And by the way, the show was
absolutely well done. Oh, thank you. Thank you for being here. It’s so special
to have you all. ( sobbing ) This tour has been
an example, personally, of perseverance for me,
because as I’m talking about these experiences of loss, no one really knows
what I’m going through
with my dad. It’s stage-four cancer. It started out as something that I knew
my dad would beat, but they’re really having
a hard time treating it. My mom was just calling
to tell me, like, “We’re going to hear
news back next week, but just prepare yourself, because I don’t want you to get really bad news
out of nowhere.” I was just
starting to get up from the wave
that just hit me, so it’s really hard
to experience this again. And it’s really hard not to go back
into a little shell. I wasn’t expecting that today. Drew: Yeah. I don’t think you could
ever be prepared to be told
to prepare yourself. No, not at all. Basically, we were told
by the doctors to prepare for good-bye. I started flying home
every day off. You know, from New York,
to Arizona, back to D.C. I’m just trying to spend
as much time as I can. He’s fought such a hard fight, and in so many ways I am the woman I am today
because of my dad. – What do you think?
– I think it’s awesome. I really attribute this sense
of adventure to him. It’s really hard when you see
people start to lose hope. What time is meet and greet? Man: 6 to 7. Drew:
With her father’s diagnosis, obviously there are days
where it’s extremely difficult and we just all try
and be there for her. It’s been a really,
really rough one. There’s just stress there
to begin with, let alone these two massive,
major issues in her life. ( no audible dialogue ) But she flips a switch,
gets up, wipes the tears off,
and just, like, “Okay, I’ve got to be
Lindsey Stirling. I can’t be…
Lindsey Stirling.” – Oh, I’m so ready.
– Let’s do it! – Hey, come on in.
– Hi! – Oh, my gosh.
– Hello! Ooh, you’re so pretty.
I love your hair. Lindsey:
I try to be really
optimistic with my fans. So cool. You want to be uplifting. Yeah! Where does one get
a stormtrooper helmet? It’s a constant battle
to be that kind of person. ( chattering ) Yeah, come over here. But it doesn’t mean
I don’t have days when I don’t win the fight. …what to do with my life. And a few days later
your album came out and that song “Don’t Let
This Feeling Fade” came up. God, like,
I just knew right there
that I had something to do. I’m so glad
that you enjoyed it and that it
meant something to you. – Thank you so much.
– Thank you. Everybody has bad days, but when bad days
are compounded by grief, it’s really hard to feel like
I can be everything I need and want to be
for my fans when you hurt so much inside. You know,
you really saved my life. I was going through
a really dark time and, um, I was at the brink, and your music came on and it just reminded
to hang on. And your music
always pulls me through. Oh, girl.
Thank you for sharing that. That’s so beautiful. ( music playing ) A lot of the songs
on “Brave Enough” obviously were written,
inspired by, you know, losing Gavi, and they kind of gain
a whole new depth now thinking about the fact that I’m probably
going to lose my dad. “Lost Girls” is about
being lost emotionally. and fighting the urge
to go back into your comfort zone. It’s this really beautiful symbolic journey
of this little ballerina discovering herself
in the forest. And she almost goes back
into her snow globe, but chooses to stay free. ♪ Lost girls ♪ Lost girls find a way ♪ Lost girls ♪ Lost girls find a way ( applause ) Lindsey:
I can’t believe
we’ve now been on tour for three months. Tonight is our final show, in Phoenix, my hometown. My dad will be at the show. He is so excited to see it. My dad has just
always been so proud. I think it’s going to be
really, really special. I can’t believe
it’s the last day. It’s insane to me. Woman:
Yeah, I hear you. This has been an extremely
exhausting tour, not only just physically, but also have
the built-up emotions about what my family’s
going through and worrying about my dad. – Want me to push him?
– Sure, that would be great. Hi! – Here’s the man himself.
– Look who’s here. Stephen: My name
is Stephen J. Stirling and I am Lindsey’s father. I’ve come to see the last
performance in Phoenix. What do you
warm up to first? I usually do scales
and then I play– I like to play
the song I open with so I can imagine
that I’m doing it. I’m really excited. I’m going home with
my parents tonight. I’m loading up in the car and we’re going to go home and just spend time
with my family. – How you feeling today?
– A lot better. – You look better.
– You do. You look really
just awake today
and you look great. There’s color in your skin
and light in those eyes. I was dead yesterday
because they worked me out
too much yesterday. I know.
You know, that was pretty, pretty intense
what you go through. And today, uh-oh. So today you didn’t
have to go to the doctor? – Nice! Day off.
– Are you done? Stephen:
It’s delightful for me to come to these venues,
these experiences. First concert I went to,
it blew me away. Little girls there
that came to see Lindsey. “Will you sign my violin?” And then I was standing
in front of a guy. He was a great big
burly biker, you know, with braids down
the back of his– and he’s just–
just having a great time. I’ve taken a lot of inspiration
from just watching Lindsey and seeing how she’s coped and handled
her father’s cancer. In many ways, these trials
have brought us together more. There’s always
a silver lining. We stick together. You need to stop worrying
about everybody else– Well, I will. Well, of course
I’m proud of her. I’m proud of her for the way
she has used her talents to share with
the world the joy and the brightness
that is her life and her personality. Stephen:
What Lindsey does
is also quite fearless. With Lindsey, it’s more
than just the performance or more than just
becoming a rock star. Lindsey has
a statement to make. She wants someone to walk away
having learned something. I don’t think there
are words to describe what a father can feel,
that I feel, that Lindsey’s accomplished. Man on PA:
Final ten-minute call
for show. – Last one!
– Last pray, last pray. Father, we’re so grateful that we can all
be here together… There was a lot
all happening at once as I was preparing this album and preparing this tour, and I was turning 30, I had just lost
my best friend. I feel like
I’ve been really brave. And it’s not because
I was born that way, and it’s not because
it’s natural to me, because it’s not. But it’s because Gavi
and my dad made me realize that every time
we go through a big trial, we get a little braver. – Jesus Christ, amen.
– All: Amen. – ( music playing )
– ( cheering ) ♪ Don’t let
this feeling fade ♪ ♪ Launch into the sky
like a private plane ♪ ♪ Hang on,
we’ll ride this wave ♪ ♪ Watch the tide
come in a little ♪ ♪ Just a little
more each day ♪ ♪ Don’t let
this feeling fade ♪ ♪ Don’t let this feeling ♪ Hang on,
we’ll ride this wave ♪ ♪ Launch into the sky
like a private ♪ ♪ Fly like a private plane ♪ Don’t let this feeling ♪ Don’t let
this feeling fade ♪ ♪ Turn it up,
let me hear you live ♪ ♪ Don’t let this feeling ♪ Don’t let
this feeling fade ♪ ♪ One life, one love ( cheers and applause ) Lindsey: Whoo!
Thank you so much, Phoenix! I want to bring out
my whole crew! ♪ Don’t let this feeling ♪ Don’t let
this feeling fade ♪ ♪ Turn it up,
let me hear you live ♪ ♪ Don’t let this feeling ♪ Don’t let
this feeling fade ♪ ♪ One life, one love ( cheering ) Lindsey:
I didn’t have time with Gavi to say all the things
I wanted to say. I didn’t get to say good-bye or tell him everything
I wanted him to know, or how much I cared. I think the process
of losing Gavi helped me realize
that I wanted things to be different with my dad. I knew that this was coming, and I made changes in my life so that I would have as
little regrets as possible. What a blessing it was to have
some time with my dad. You’re the best puppy
in the world. The best Luners. ( music playing ) I’m finally
going back on tour. It’s just hitting me
right now. I’m about to head out
on the European run of the “Brave Enough” tour. I’m so excited. ( line ringing ) – Hi, Lindsey.
– Hey, Mommy! I’m on my way
to the airport right now, but I just wanted to
call you to say, you know, say good-bye
before I leave. Did you take your
supplements with you? I… brought some of them. Okay. All right,
I love you, sweetheart. – Good-bye.
– Love you, too. Bye. She’s such a mom. Life is not one journey
to a destination. It’s a constant fight,
it’s a constant battle to stay optimistic, even if you’ve been hurt
multiple times. The scars that you carry, they can either make you hard or they can make you strong, make you empathetic
and not bitter. And we all have that choice.
It’s a climb. You can rise past your trials.
You can be brave. As I continue to perform, I know my dad
will be there with me, because he’s always been
my biggest fan. ( cheers and applause ) ( music playing )

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *