Postcards: Street Theater, Movies & Dance

Postcards: Street Theater, Movies & Dance


ANNOUNCER: The following
program is a production of   Pioneer Public Television.   [music]   NARRATOR: In this
episode of Postcards.   This is what I want to do.   I want to create theatre
in small towns and I want   to tell stories and I want
to bring people together   and I want to remind
them what they have and,   and help revitalize
these communities.   I think the Grand is
unique in that it’s really   supported by
the community.   There are a lot of small
town theaters that closed   many years ago and the
Grand has always had great   community support.   I can’t ever remember even
wanting to be a dancer I   just always was a dancer.   [Postcards theme music]   [Postcards theme music]   ANNOUNCER: This
program on Pioneer   Public Television
is funded by the Minnesota   Arts and
Cultural Heritage Fund,   with money from the vote
of the people of Minnesota   on November fourth, 2008.   Additional support
provided by Mark and   Margaret-Yackel Juleen, in
honor of Shalom Hill Farm,   a non-profit, rural
education retreat center   in a beautiful prairie
setting near Windom in   southwestern Minnesota,
shalomhillfarm.org.   The Arrowwood Resort
and Conference Center.   Your ideal choice for
Minnesota resorts offering   luxury town homes,
18 holes of golf,   Darling Reflections
Spa, Big Splash Waterpark,   and much more.   Alexandria, Minnesota, a
relaxing vacation or great   location for an event.   Explorealex.com.   Easy to get to,
hard to leave.   NARRATOR: PlaceBase
Productions creates   stories around the history
and needs of specific   communities, involving the
local people and landscape   in the performances.   I’m the producer and
director for PlaceBase   Productions and PlaceBase
Productions is a,   is a theatre company
that does site-specific   community based
works of art,   interactive in nature,
based on the stories of an   area, the
history of the area,   and the kind of current
climate of a community   looking, looking backwards
in order to look forward   is the kind of goal of,
of the productions that we   create.   We want to create places
in small communities where   people can gather to tell
their stories and reenact   their stories and find how
their stories are just as   relevant to their lives
today and their lives in   the future as in all of
their potential futures   as, as those
stories were to the past.   PlaceBase Productions
comes into these small   towns is because it’s,
it’s a passion of both   Andrew and mine to share
these stories in the hopes   that we can, we can pass
on that love of community   that existed in
previous generations,   to highlight some of the
resources that I think   oftentimes just get
forgotten about to,   to reinvigorate that life
force of the small town   America.   So PlaceBase has a three
stage model that we follow   that we’ve developed over
the past year and a half.   The first phase is the
community research and   script development phase
and at that point it’s   really where we’re
embedding ourselves in   this community where we’re
talking to people that are   already gathered, and then
we also hold these story   swap workshops to gather
and generate as much   material as we can, so by
the time that the research   phase is done, we have way
more stories than we know   what to do with.   So really the hard part
is whittling that down and   really picking the hour,
hour and a half of stories   we want to highlight and
stringing that narrative   together, which is in the
script development phase   and at that junctior we
are in constant dialogue   with each
other, Andrew and I,   as well as with
the community.   We share the script with
a few folks that we’ve   gotten to know really well
and that have a lot of the   facts in place
that we can say,   “Are we accurately
representing your   community” is what
we’re saying completely   factional, you know did
we get the names right or   fictional you know how are
we representing this in a   way that is true to the
voice of the community and   take that feedback and
some of it we apply and   some of it we, you know
take artistic liberties   with.   You couldn’t name
your child after me?!   She’s a girl captain.   Well, that’s okay then.   Captain, she’s beautiful!   I’m so glad we
came on this trip,   even against the
advice of my doctor.   I love you dearest.   We send out a call for
auditions to papers all   over the area and
we have two days.   I picked a different song.   Good, good!   I like different songs!   Cause it was, it was from
Wicked and just like when   I heard it, it made me
think of you guys so.   Yay!   Okay.   [Singing] I’ve heard it
said that people come into   our lives for a reason.   It’s a rebel
or a poor pie,   or a slouch, even a
fascinator long as you can   see it, because you will
not catch me dead without   a hat upon my head and if
I turn a couple of heads   my way, so be it.   Awesome.   Once the
rehearsal process begins,   then that’s the mode
that I enjoy most,   time just
flies by and it’s,   it’s working with people
who I love and challenging   people and being
challenged in return and   its lots of dialogue,
its lots of just,   just very powerful
human interactions.   [music]   I think that
this, this process is   transformational in a
way that is really hard to   convey.   I think in some respects
me being in the position   that I’m in with
the newspaper,   I’m able to get a bird’s
eye view of the community.   And, and you can see
the ripple effect.   And I’ve been through it
you know this again my   third time, I’ve
seen it enough where,   where I know that the
effects are going to be   profound and they’re
going to be positive and,   and it’s going to leave
the community better.   I’m excited to, to see
how it manifests itself.   My name is Barb Benson.   I was Barb Lundel and
our family is in the play.   I mean my dad, my
grandfather even they’re   quoting, or they’re having
be part of the play,   and my mom and dad
and my sister and I.   Ashley and
Andrew are great,   they just really are.   They get everybody excited
and you know make it fun,   and that’s good.   I think we work well
together because we share   the same goals for what
we’re doing and our goals   relate to
creating community,   building community,
making great art,   working in a
dialogical way.   With each production the
partnering organization   that we work with has
full rights to the script.   The community can
access the script.   If they wanted to produce
it again without us that   would be absolutely
awesome and encouraged so   it belongs here because
we can’t mount this show   somewhere else
you know it is,   it is of the landscape
and it is written for the   landscape and for the
people that walk through   the door at auditions,
so it lives here.   This is what I want to do,
I want to create theatre   in small towns and I want
to tell stories and I want   to bring people together
and I want to remind them   what they have and
help revitalize these   communities because
they can’t go away.   [music]   [music]   NARRATOR:
Visit pioneer.org for more   information on Postcards
and other Pioneer   productions.   NARRATOR: With its art
deco flair and improved   digital sound and quality,
the community of Madison   takes pride in their
local movie theater,   the Grand.   [music] Well I got
involved in the Grand   about 20 years
ago when Rick Gail,   who’s the local newspaper
editor came up to me and   said that he and I ought
to get together and reopen   the theater which had been
closed for a couple of   years.   So the city actually
owned it then and the city   actually owns it now.   So Rick Gail and I formed
a partnership and reopened   the theatre running it
four nights   a week as we do now.   And Rick dropped out a
couple of years into the   partnership after we got
it going and my partner   now is Kristy
Kuechenmeister is also the   office manager over at
the radio station has been   with us there for 29 years
so Kristy and I are the   operators of the theatre.   No we really don’t make
any money with the Grand   Theater.   We do it as a, as
a public service.   It’s kind of fun just
to have something to get   people in and
see some cars on,   on main street.   I guess one thing that
intrigued me about the   whole thing, I kind of
like the mechanical side   of the whole thing so
the projectors and playing   with all the toys in
the theatre was kind of   fascinating and now that
we’ve entered into the   digital age where we
have the computers,   I’m looking at computers
all day at the radio   station so now we look at
the computers all night   when we come over here to
the Grand Theater so it’s   just kind of, kind of fun
little challenge to keep   it all going.   The Grand Theater opened
in the early 1900s and ran   as a single screen theatre
for a lot of years.   About 1939 I believe it
was the film caught on   fire and the theatre
burned down to the ground   and the projectionist at
the time was killed in   that accident but no
one else was injured.   And then in about 1941 or
1942 The Grand was built   again and operated as a
single screen theatre til   probably sometime in the,
in the 80s when another   screen was added and
it is what it is today.   A lot of the architecture
here at the Grand is from   art deco period back in
the 40s and into the 50s.   Got a lot of wings
and circles and kind of   geometric circles and
designs and things like   that.   We try to maintain a lot
of that when we did a lot   of the restructuring or
rebuilding of the theatre   when the heating was added
and this kind of thing.   We tried to leave a lot
of the older décor in the   theater so that it would
maintain the décor and a   lot of memories for
people of all the,   the decorations we
have on the wall.   To get the theatre
into the digital age,   we started checking around
to some of the companies   that do the digital
conversions and getting   some price quotes and
we just started raising   money, contacting people,
sending letters out,   doing articles in the
local paper and elsewhere   about what we were doing
and we started raising   money.   I think our biggest donor
of the whole project was a   $5,000 donation that came
in from a former Madison   resident who now
lives in California.   But most of it was done
with a thousand dollar,   five hundred or a hundred
dollar donations so it was   an awful lot of donations
that came in to raise the,   the, it was about 106,000
we raised there and the   rest of the money coming
from some city reserves,   therefore the theater.   We took about three
days to do the whole   installation to remove
the old equipment to get   everything new installed
so it was three solid days   and we were back in
business by the first   matinee we showed on
a Friday afternoon.   Some of the
changes we made,   we put in new
screens in both theaters,   put in new masking
around the screens,   did a little painting,
new projection equipment,   surround sound speakers
which we didn’t have   before.   Before it was just an old
speaker sitting behind,   one speaker sitting behind
the stage and now there   are three
cabinets behind each,   each screen and surround
sound speakers around the   walls and several hundred
watts of power and it’s   like being right in the
middle of it now with all   of that and the picture
is nice and crystal clear   with the
digital presentation.   [music]   People that come
here from larger cities   are surprised how low the
prices are for price of   admission.   The average price in the
country I think is 12 to   15 dollars right now
and we’re still averaging   around five dollars
here at the Grand and the   popcorn’s good and it’s
a lot cheaper than other   places too.   [music]   I think The Grand
is unique in that it’s   really supported
by the community.   There are a lot of small
town theatres that closed   many years ago and the
Grand has always had great   community support and it’s
just kind of a gathering   place for the community,
something for the kids to do.   [music]   Some of the people
that have donated money   for it probably
haven’t ever set,   set foot in it but they
see the importance of   having a movie theatre
in their community as   something that other
communities don’t have.   I remember coming here
with my folks in the 50s.   We’d come and
watch Three Stooges,   and Ma Pa Kettle,
and a lot of Westerns,   really enjoyed them.   We moved to Madison when
I was five and I’ve been   going here ever since.   I like coming to the Grand
Theatre because I get   candy and slushies and
I get to see movies.   It’s local.   It’s locally run locally
so we don’t have to drive   a hundred miles to see a
nice movie and have fun   and, very reasonable.   It’s not very far and it’s
very convenient just to go   with my friends whenever we feel
like it like a Friday night.   See a movie at the
Grand Theater in Madison,   MN, showing Friday,
September 13th through   Monday, September 16th in
theater one its Disney’s   “Planes” rated PG.   Animated kid’s comedy,
that’s “Planes” PG in   theater one.   And in theater two, Matt
Damon and Jodie Foster   star in the
science fiction fantasy,   “Elysium.”   That’s “Elysium”
rated R in theater two.   Show times seven and
nine Friday and Saturday,   once nightly at seven and
Sunday and Monday at the Grand.   NARRATOR: Do you have an
idea for the Postcards   team? Email us.
[email protected]   NARRATOR: Find out why   Sara Konsbruck decided to
leave her master’s degree   behind and instead spends
her time sharing her love   of dance and fitness
with young and old alike.   I don’t even know
why I started dancing.   I was three years old.   I, I’m sure it was
something that my parents   signed me up for thinking
that I would enjoy not,   I’m sure not realizing
that it would turn into   almost a career for me.   [music]   Did I always
think I was a good dancer?   Um, no.   I think when I finally
getting really confident   in my dancing wasn’t until
college where I was able   to just be really
comfortable in my own skin   and feel good on stage.   I was a school counselor
for two years part-time   and I had to travel to
get to the school that had   hired me, and the travel
just turned too much.   You know it was, I
was doing the school   counseling thing
two days a week.   I was working in the town
where I lived for a couple   days a week, I was
waitressing on the   weekends, teaching
dance and fitness in the   evenings, it
was, it was insane.   It was just so much so
this year I decided that   something had to go
and, and it was the school   counseling thing strangely
enough even though that’s   what I had my degree in
and what I had worked for   all of college and all
of grad school it just,   I didn’t love it as
much as I love dancing.   I do like to work.   I like to be busy I think
is the better description.   I don’t, being,
standing still is just not   something that I was ever
really good at so and I   just happen to work a lot.   I’m learning that there
are other important things   besides work.   Relationships being one of
them so a new relationship   has made me realize like
I can slow down and I can   stop and smell the
roses more or less.   The studio that I
teach at locally is called   Footnotes Studio of Dance
and Footnotes has been   around since 2004 where
actually my best friend   opened, opened the doors
our senior year in college   so we were both college
seniors working to finish   our degrees and my friend
decided she needed to open   a dance studio so I stood
by here and helped her out   with the knowledge that I
was going to be leaving   and going to grad
school the following year.   So I helped her open that
up and taught with her,   worked with her
very closely on that.   She continued running the
studio while I was in grad   school and then when I
ended up coming back to   town, she welcomed me back
with open arms and was   really excited to have me
teaching for her again so yeah.   When I was in college, I
was a member of a student   organization called Dance
Ensemble and through my   four years of college I
choreographed for them and   then I spent a year as the
co-chair of the organization.   Then now coming
back to town,   the organization has asked
me to choreograph for them.   So for the last, this will
be the third year in a row   now that I’ve been the
guest choreographer for   Dance Ensemble.   Not only am I working with
young dancers age fourth   grade to twelfth grade
but I’m also working with   college students and, and
teaching dance that way too.   I am a licensed Zumba
instructor and Zumba is a   dance fitness class that
emphasizes Latin dance and   Latin styles, but
that’s not all it is.   It’s really an
international dance and   international music
style of fitness class.   It’s, it’s a lot of fun.   You can incorporate tons
of different dance styles,   tons of
different music styles,   some things that
are top 40 pop music,   then you’ve got a salsa
song that is 20 years old   or you can incorporate
just about anything and   call it Zumba.   I love teaching Zumba
especially to non-dancers   because somebody who was a
basketball player growing   up will come to class
and be really successful,   or somebody who had
never really done a lot of   sports or fitness types
of things will come to a   Zumba class and leave with
a big smile on their face   and that’s, that’s
what I love about Zumba.   [music]   I just, I’m not a
dancer but whenever I do   Zumba I feel
like I can dance.   I love Sara’s Zumba cause
she has so much fun doing   it like, just her face
like you can see on her   face that she just
loved what she’s doing.   [music]   It’s been a long
time but I did come to the   very first class and
I’ve loved it ever since.   It actually motivated
me to start working out   because it actually
is a fun workout,   she makes it enjoyable,
she makes it energetic and   she just does a
great job and it’s,   it’s a lot of fun.   For dance I do all
my own choreography.   I will get inspiration
from different things or,   or see maybe another group
did a similar style and,   and borrow
ideas from that.   I, I really like getting
ideas from young dancers.   They come up with some
pretty crazy stuff but   once in awhile, something
that they do or a way that   they move will inspire a
combination or a movement   for me in the
choreography.   [music]   I can’t ever
remember even wanting to   be a dancer; I just
always was a dancer.   I started dancing when I
was three and pretty much   never stopped.   [music]   NARRATOR:
Do you use Facebook,   Twitter, or
other social media?   Connect with us to get
immediate access to behind   the scenes
videos, previews,   and other Postcards
and Pioneer news.   [Singing] “One,
two, one, two,   one, two, three four.”   [music]   “Well I said life’s
a drag but not mine,   but not mine.   Although my walls
empty most the time.   All the sun was
shinin’ on my back.   Well listen to the sound
of them old smoke stacks.   And I’ll never know
which way I ought to go.   I raise one finger to
the wind and it’s down the   road I go.   Soon you’re
feeling down in doubts,   oh don’t you fret
and don’t you pout,   when I hear
the people say,   ‘Time’s are hard
the skies are gray,   oh I’ll be singing life’s
a drag but not mine.”   [music]   [music]   [music]   [Singing] “Hey I
said life’s a drag but not   mine, but not mine.   Although the market’s
always in decline,   you see I don’t
own a fancy car,   them old houses, they’re
made of golden bars.   Oh well this old session
man it gives me the   impression that some folks
must learn a lesson cause   I can’t feel a thing.   Oh so your bank
account is low,   and you’re feeling like
there ain’t no place to   go, oh when I
hear the people say,   ‘Time’s are hard,
skies are gray,   I’ll be singing life’s
a drag but not mine.”   [music]   [music]   [music]   [Singing] “Hey I
said life’s a drag but not   mine, but not mine.   Oh I left home
when I was five.   Peddling down the
road on tempered steel,   my legs too short to
ride an automobile.   Oh it was sad
seeing me go,   I saw my face on
telephone poles,   I raise one finger to
the wind and it’s down the   road I go.   So when you’re
feeling down and doubts,   don’t you fret
and don’t you pout.   When I hear
the people say,   ‘Time’s are hard,
skies are gray,   I’ll be singing life’s
a drag but not mine,   oh no, I’ll be singing
life’s a drag but not mine.”   [music]   [Singing] “He cut
her in half with a shiny   steel saw, he put her all
back together and I was in   awe as rabbits, and doves,
and bandanas appeared,   and he pulled a quarter
right out of my ear.   And I turned to
my dad and I said,   ‘How’d he do it?’ And my
daddy just laughed and he   said,” As soon as the
helicopter passes I’ll   tell you. “There’s
nothin’ to it.   It’s magic and you don’t
want to know just how it’s   done, it would
ruin the show.   You just got to believe
cause believing is what   makes it happen.   Oh it’s nothing
but magic, magic,   magic,” That’s your
part to sing with me,   “Its magic, its
magic, its magic.   I fell in love the first
time in eighth grade and I   started shaving
the very next day.   ANNOUNCER: This program on
Pioneer Public Television   is funded by the Minnesota
Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.   With money from the vote
of the people of Minnesota   on November fourth, 2008.   Additional support
provided by Mark and   Margaret-Yackel Juleen, in
honor of Shalom Hill Farm,   a non-profit, rural
education retreat center   in a beautiful prairie
setting near Windom in   southwestern Minnesota,
shalomhillfarm.org.   The Arrowwood Resort
and Conference Center.   Your ideal choice for
Minnesota resorts offering   luxury town homes,
18 holes of golf,   Darling Reflections
Spa, Big Splash Waterpark,   and much more.   Alexandria, Minnesota, a
relaxing vacation or great   location for an event.   Explorealex.com.   Easy to get to,
hard to leave.   [Postcards theme music]   Captioned by Pioneer   Public Television 2014   [Postcards theme music]  

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