Yasujirō Ozu – The Depth of Simplicity | CRISWELL | Cinema Cartography

Yasujirō Ozu – The Depth of Simplicity | CRISWELL | Cinema Cartography


Tokyo Story (1953) Late Autumn (1960) Good Morning (1959) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Late Spring (1949) Equinox Flower (1958) The Flavour of Green Tea Over Rice (1952) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) The End of Summer (1961) The Record of A Tenement Gentleman (1947) Floating Weeds (1959) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Tokyo Twilight (1957) There Was A Father (1942) Good Morning (1959) Equinox Flower (1958) Late Autumn (1960) Tokyo Story (1953) Good Morning (1959) Late Spring (1949) There Was A Father (1942) Equinox Flower (1958) The Only Son (1936) Late Autumn (1960) Late Spring (1949) Floating Weeds (1959) Tokyo Chorus (1931) The End of Summer (1961) Tokyo Twilight (1957) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Late Autumn (1960) Equinox Flower (1958) Late Spring (1949) Early Summer (1951) Tokyo Story (1953) Good Morning (1959) Early Spring (1956) The End of Summer (1961) The Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family (1941) Floating Weeds (1959) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Late Spring (1949) I Was Born…But (1932) Late Autumn (1960) Equinox Flower (1958) Late Spring (1949) The End of Summer (1961) Flavour of Green Tea Over Rice (1952) The End of Summer (1961) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Good Morning (1959) Tokyo Twilight (1957) Floating Weeds (1959) Tokyo Story (1953) Late Autumn (1960) The Only Son (1936) Late Spring (1949) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) An Inn In Tokyo (1935) Tokyo Story (1953) Equinox Flower (1958) Good Morning (1959) Late Spring (1949) The Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family (1941) Tokyo Story (1953) The End of Summer (1961) Equinox Flower (1958) Late Autumn (1960) Early Summer (1951) Floating Weeds (1959) Late Spring (1949) I Was Born…But (1932) Tokyo Story (1953) The Only Son (1936) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) The Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family (1941) Early Summer (1951) A Hen In The Wind (1948) What Did The Lady Forget? (1937) Late Spring (1949) An Inn In Tokyo (1935) Early Spring (1956) What Did The Lady Forget? (1937) Aki Kaurisimaki on Ozu An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Good Morning (1959) Late Spring (1949) The End of Summer (1961) Floating Weeds (1959) Early Summer (1951) The End of Summer (1961) Late Spring (1949) I Was Born…But (1932) There Was A Father (1942) Equinox Flower (1958) Good Morning (1959) The Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family (1941) The Only Son (1936) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) The Record of a Tenement Gentleman (1947) Late Autumn (1960) Tokyo Story (1953) Equinox Flower (1958) What Did The Lady Forget? (1937) Good Morning (1959) I Was Born But… (1932) Tokyo Twilight (1957) The End of Summer (1961) The Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family (1941) Floating Weeds (1959) Equinox Flower (1958) What Did The Lady Forget? (1937) Tokyo Story (1953) Early Spring (1956) There Was A Father (1942) Late Autumn (1960) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Tokyo Twilight (1957) The Record of a Tenement Gentleman (1947) Good Morning (1959) The Brothers And Sisters of the Toda Family (1941) Tokyo Story (1953) Late Spring (1949) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Tokyo Twilight (1957) Dragnet Girl (1933) Equinox Flower (1958) Late Autumn (1960) Good Morning (1959) Early Summer (1957) Floating Weeds (1959) The Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family (1941) Tokyo Story (1953) The End of Summer (1961) The Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family (1941) The Record of a Tenement Gentleman (1947) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Dragnet Girl (1933) Late Spring (1949) Equinox Flower (1958) An Inn In Tokyo (1935) Floating Weeds (1959) Tokyo Story (1953) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) A Hen In The Wind (1948) The Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family (1941) The End of Summer (1961) There Was A Father (1942) Floating Weeds (1959) Late Spring (1949) Equinox Flower (1958) A Hen In The Wind (1948) Tokyo Story (1953) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Early Summer (1951) The End of Summer (1961) Tokyo Story (1953) A Hen In The Wind (1948) Late Autumn (1960) Early Summer (1951) Equinox Flower (1958) Floating Weeds (1959) Tokyo Story (1953) Late Autumn (1960) Late Spring (1949) What Did The Lady Forget? (1937) Good Morning (1959) Equinox Flower (1958) The Only Son (1936) Tokyo Twilight (1957) Floating Weeds (1959) There Was A Father (1942) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Tokyo Story (1953) The Flavour of Green Tea Over Rice (1952) Late Spring (1949) Equinox Flower (1958) What Did The Lady Forget? (1937) Tokyo Twilight (1957) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Good Morning (1959) Late Spring (1949) An Inn In Tokyo (1935) Girish Kasaravalli On Ozu Floating Weeds (1959) Tokyo Story (1953) The End of Summer (1961) Dragnet Girl (1933) Equinox Flower (1958) Floating Weeds (1959) Tokyo Story (1953) Late Spring (1949) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Early Spring (1949) Late Autumn (1960) The End of Summer (1961) Tokyo Twilight (1957) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Late Autumn (1960) Early Summer (1951) The Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family (1941) Tokyo Story (1953) Floating Weeds (1959) Equinox Flower (1958) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) The End of Summer (1961) Late Autumn (1960) A Hen In The Wind (1948) Late Spring (1949) Floating Weeds (1959) Late Autumn (1960) What Did The Lady Forget? (1937) Early Summer (1951) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) The Only Son (1936) Late Spring (1949) Good Morning (1959) Early Spring (1949) Tokyo Twilight (1957) The End of Summer (1961) Late Autumn (1960) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) Equinox Flower (1958) Tokyo Story (1953) A Hen In The Wind (1948) Late Autumn (1960) Late Spring (1949) Floating Weeds (1959) Tokyo Twilight (1957) The Brothers and Sisters of the Toda Family (1941) Tokyo Story (1953) The End of Summer (1961) Dragnet Girl (1933) Floating Weeds (1959) Late Spring (1949) Equinox Flower (1958) Late Spring (1949) Early Summer (1951) Floating Weeds (1959) City of God (2002) Tokyo Story (1953) The Only Son (1936) Equinox Flower (1958) Floating Weeds (1959) Late Spring (1949) An Autumn afternoon (1962) Tokyo Story (1953) Floating Weeds (1959) A Hen In The Wind (1948) The Flavour of Green Tea Over Rice (1952) The End of Summer (1961) Tokyo Twilight (1957) Good Morning (1959) Late Autumn (1960) Equinox Flower (1958) Late Autumn (1960) The Record of a Tenement Gentleman (1947) An Autumn Afternoon (1962) There Was A Father (1942) Early Spring (1956) Good Morning (1959) Late Autumn (1960) Late Spring (1949) Floating Weeds (1959) Tokyo Story (1953)

100 thoughts on “Yasujirō Ozu – The Depth of Simplicity | CRISWELL | Cinema Cartography

  1. Perhaps the next analysis you could focus on is the filmography of Hou Hsiao-Hsien. Clearly a director who has followed on from Ozu's style and perhaps superseded the master in allowing a long scene to fill in the details of character and plot in an almost effortless manner. Whilst I love Ozu's films, his style seems to stick out somewhat. For mine, Hou seems to add a subtleness that is somewhat lacking from some films of Ozu's filmography.

  2. Linklater films feel very simular to this. Especially Before Sunrise. Capturing modern life and skipping big plot points. Even the editing is there when the characters move to another location. I love it. it feels like getting recognition for being human and sharing the things that we al go trough. Wonderful, wonderful cinema.

  3. Great work man…showed pieces of your "Composition of Storytelling” to my visual foundations class which I thought was lovely. One note, is it Gendai-geki?

  4. Sorry, but his filming style made his films very boring visually.

  5. I wonder of there's a way you could do subs for your voice over on the bottom, and have subs for the titles at the top, or use annotations?

  6. "It furthers the idea of impermanence, it feels as though this may be the last time we ever see this object". Thank you for phrasing that so eloquently, I've always felt that way about buildings and places I'd pass through on the way to my destination but could never put that feeling into words. There is a sense of sadness when you go to a place you've never been to or haven't visited in a long time because once you leave, you may never see it again.

  7. I love all your videos. The in-depth research, lack of distractions, clear narration- all of it adds to the quality. If possible, please do a video of Mizoguchi and Godard as well. Thank you for all the great work 🙂

  8. What I also like about Ozu's tatami shot is considering the perspective of the audience. Viewing his films in a theater would allow the eye lines of the viewers in theater seating to line up rather well with the perspective of a slightly low angle shot like the tatami shot and I've always found this rather engaging whether it was intentional or not.

  9. The consent framing device and steady movement of time and space are also why his films are so borrrrrrinnnnnnnng. It reminds me of Japanese packaging… too much focus on the facade. So much emphasis on the presentation takes away from the organic flow of the content itself, even if the content does have depth. I usually leave his films with no care at all to what happens to the characters or the environment they live in.

  10. Would anyone know what the name of the songs in the beginning and at the outro are? I assume they're from the films but I don't know which ones :/

  11. If you mute this video you could still find a coherence to the whole secuence of shots and thus tell a new diferent story; his entire body of work is like a giant compendium of intertwinedd tales. I have always thought of Ozu as an image storyteller. Like most japanese artists and their beautiful aesthetic… If the previous has any sense at all. A really nice and insightful video, mister. Thank you.

  12. Ozu is by far the greatest Japanese director in history. Only a genius like he can appear to express the same message over and over without tiring the mind and the soul. His films are gorgeous studies of the human condition.

  13. Think of this: Ozu only entered the cinema because a relative got him a job at Shochiku Studios, where he would spend the rest of his career, more or less. Before that, he was a failed teacher who drank too much. (Though as a film director, he still drank too much.) So if it wasn't for nepotism, the world would miss out on all that beauty. Think about it!

  14. There are a lot of recommendations that we would love to hear these assays from, but I'm hoping since you covered Ozu's work, that one day you can cover the works of Jacque Tati since they share the same love of silence, balance and direction imo

  15. These films feel like home, not my home, not any of the character's home, but the embodiment of wherever we are. I feel connected to every single event without even watching these films. If i grew up watching these i feel that i would remember them for the rest of my life, like it's another home.

  16. Before Sunrise by Richard Linklater is the only non-Ozu film I can think of that holds shots on locations. The entire film goes over one night where two people decide to spend the night together in Paris on a whim. The film goes almost in real time as it follows them strolling through stores, over bridges, visiting some small landmarks, etc. Then when they separate and leave, the last few minutes of the film are still shots recapping everywhere they've been, and it really strikes a chord seeing all of these random, otherwise mundane places be connected by a story.

  17. You have to be a true cinephile to appreciate Ozu movies. Modern movie going audiences would be bored out of their minds watching his films along with Bergman and Tarkovsky.

  18. If you want to get started on Ozu, start with "Late Autumn". It's in colour, has very attractive leads, shows some interesting bits of life in Japan in the 1950s, and is a very affecting story. It's got the great Setsuko Hara (who needs no introductions), Yoko Tsukasa (arguably one of the most beautiful women that graced the screen), and Mariko Okada (who steals every scene she walks into). Pure delight.

  19. hi lewis, i have a group with 800 vietnamese memebers. I want to share your clip with them and translate from english to vietnamese your script. could you send me your script and I can do it ? Thanks your work. I watch another clip nightcrawler and like it too.

  20. I thought 80mm was meant to be the most similar to the human vision? Or is it just the length which makes portraits look good…? My life is a lie.

  21. if i were to make an injunction right now maybe it would've been that the only real classic cinema is ozu's opus: platonic images screened only once in at that cave back in peloponnese. the totality of monumental tofu.

  22. Thank you for this great video ! Have you read Ishaghpour's "Forms of impermanence" about Ozu's style ?

    However, I don't completely agree with your saying that everything in Ozu's films take place within the limits of the frame : there is a strong sens of what Deleuze calls "absolute off-screen", with for example the eyes fixed on an off-screen place (the end of "Tokyo Story" while hearing the boat) and the empty rooms before and after a character comes in.

    Anyway, this is real good job, I hope you'll continue makinf new videos for a long time !

  23. "That's why in all his films nothing happens off camera"
    Huh??
    Ozu is famous for his elliptical plot structures, where often many scenes (including even the film’s climax) happen off camera.
    The wedding scene, the death scene, etc.

  24. Things happen off-camera, contrary to what you said. In Late Spring, the marriage is off-camera. In Tokyo Story, the death is off-camera.

  25. Great Video essay. I want to know your thoughts about one aspect of cinema outside cinematography , ACTING. What, in your opinion, makes a great performance? Your thoughts about Italian-Neo realist films and its influence to modern cinema. Would a great performance overshadows a carefully arranged mise-en-scene?

  26. This guy named Blake Worrell shot the same style on his phone!  I just saw his video and thought about this lesson… he’s nomiated here:  https://youtu.be/aeLym1cjE00

  27. My favorite Youtube Channel ever. Thank you so much, I learn so much from these videos. I watch my favorite movies in a different light, and it inspires me to write my own analysis of my favorite books, movies, songs, etc. Thank you for the teaching and inspiration.

  28. Interesting video, but plenty happens off camera in Ozu's films, both in narrative and in frame. We often see characters walk off screen and still hear them, or we a focused on a hallway while characters are crossing it to enter various rooms. Also in Late Spring it is implied that Noriko goes to see the play and we only see a poster.

  29. The commentary is insightful and the choice of excerpts is excellent – a worthy tribute to the great Ozu!

    A slight quibble – the 50mm lens in 35mm still photography is a "normal" lens – in 35mm movie photography, I think it is a very mild telephoto, since the frame size is smaller, isn't it?

  30. Explanation through the aesthetic
    Frames within frames
    Perspective in and with the actors
    The cinematic character of everyday life

  31. But there are so many open frames in A Tokyo Story? Like when the little boy throws something from the other room. He's unseen but obviously a part of that frame's meaning.

  32. I came back to your video again because I kept thinking of Ozu while watching ROMA.
    Your knowledge is astonishing.

  33. Hi bro, those analysis about the directors and movies are really valuable for me. i am a big fan of James Cameron, Christopher Nolan please make a video about their making pls.

  34. It was said that Kurosawa was the Beethoven of Cinema. Ozu, then, doesn't get his comparison from classical music, but from literature. In this case Ozu would be the Marcel Proust of film, showing us the little things in our lives mattering more.

  35. i love this video, u've managed to describe very subtle but crucial aspects of Ozu's filmmaking however I do feel like you contradict yourself at times, especially when speaking of his use of time and space. The framing of the characters but then the eliptical editing and then the vacant spaces.. something seems to create some friction in between these theories

  36. Well done. Your analysis is not only excellent, concise and, simultaneously, comprehensive, but more then that, it is in regard to its content deep and it is narrated fluent and light. Your focus on aesthetics is adequate and right, your avoidance of „key words“ and „too much jargon“ is fresh and useful. Congratulations ,

  37. Although verbose and meritorious, this review misses the depth of the art of Mr. Ozu. Mr. Ozu does not care for anything but the story, the opposite of the Hollywood and other foreign types and styles.His actors and actresses what their turn to act and speakmore calmly than others, his children bring the devilment that is in all children but again in true Japanese style. This review also missed the similarities in direction between the art of Mr. Ozu and theatre/ drama direction. Well done though for adding to the focus on one of the greatest artists ever.

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